10

In my experience, it comes down to 4 things. Wilderness First Responder Certification: The first course is 80 hours and then you need to recertify after 2 years. There are other certifications such as a Wilderness EMT but this is pretty much the standard. Organization specific instructor course: When you become an instructor for an organization you usually ...


8

Does it make sense to train rock climbing wearying a weight vest... ? To expand a bit on what Jan said: it depends on why you're training. Back when I was a solid gym rat, some of my climbing was to learn technique. Some was to build strength. Some was to practice. Some was for flexibility. Some was to build endurance. The more hard core folks that ...


7

Climbers in a climbing gym may not necesserily be training for climbing natural rocks - some are probably just training to become better at indoor climbing, or are doing it for recreation alone. Some people probably do not want to be encumbered with their outdoor climbing gear. They might figure that as long as there are still some routes left in the gym ...


5

Adding weight is an extremely efficient way to strengthen core, leg and back muscles - and also your fingers, depending on what kind of training you are doing. I have been training with extra weight for quite a while, and I think I can add something to the discussion. Most people interested in climbing 5.13 will end up finger boarding and campusing. This ...


4

I'm in much the same boat as you, 180cm, 90kg. I started climbing a couple of years ago and again, most of my climbing buddies are a good 20-40kg lighter and a few cm shorter than me. Climbers are lean and small, kayakers... are not. The thing is that the kayaking already gives me really good base grip strength, 50-60kg grip trainers are no problem, it's ...


4

The specifics of this are unique to the person, but in general: Just keep going climbing. There are (very broadly speaking) two factors which determine how hard you can climb. Technique, or how you move and position your body Strength, or how strong your body is Going climbing will improve both of these things. You'll get comfortable in the strange ...


4

A great starting point would be to undergo an intensive program in outdoor skills and leadership. In Canada there is COLT -- Canadian Outdoor Leadership Training. COLT is 100 days long and covers camping, open canoeing, whitewater kayaking, sea kayaking, hiking, rock climbing, mountaineering, and wilderness first aid. In the US, and in many other countries,...


4

I like the answer of @Charlie Brumbaugh, and it would be hard to do better as an official answer, but I would like to add the perspective of one category of prospective client: The older, highly experienced but still healthy backpacker who now needs help with carrying stuff (Sherpa help -- I hope that does not minimize the important role Sherpas play on ...


3

When you just get started climbing there is a lot of things you can learn to improve your technique, and not all of it needs to come from climbing. Things you can do outside of the gym: Try watching bouldering competitions and watch how the climbers move, pay close attention to how and where they place their feet and how they shift their body weight. A ...


2

You could try adding in a few bouldering sessions if you're mostly doing roped climbs. I find that bouldering strengthens the fingers much more than roped climbing, simply because it's higher-intensity movement on (generally) worse holds. It's a good way to condition your fingers & get better at climbing by simply climbing! Find problems that you ...


1

Everyone who has taught climbing for a while has noticed that women are better beginner climbers than men, mostly because they're lighter, have smaller hands (so can grab smaller holds more comfortably) and have less strength, which forces them to use their feet and body positioning properly. This seems to work up to 5.11. When you start thinking about ...


1

My answer is going to be: depends. When I started climbing, I was in a similar height / weight bracket as you are. However, my finger strength was fairly decent for a novice. I did install and use a fingerboard, but I never used it too much. I have friends who swore / swear by finger exercises, but I found a less-is-more approach worked for me. One of ...


1

It really depends what you are training for. If it is for a limit read point in sports climbing we are typically taking about pre placed gear anyways, so you only carry your harness. If we are taking about alpine climbing there is a lot more weight involved but this will be typically compensated by staying way below your personal feed point limit. So this ...


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