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In my experience, it comes down to 4 things. Wilderness First Responder Certification: The first course is 80 hours and then you need to recertify after 2 years. There are other certifications such as a Wilderness EMT but this is pretty much the standard. Organization specific instructor course: When you become an instructor for an organization you usually ...


4

The specifics of this are unique to the person, but in general: Just keep going climbing. There are (very broadly speaking) two factors which determine how hard you can climb. Technique, or how you move and position your body Strength, or how strong your body is Going climbing will improve both of these things. You'll get comfortable in the strange ...


4

A great starting point would be to undergo an intensive program in outdoor skills and leadership. In Canada there is COLT -- Canadian Outdoor Leadership Training. COLT is 100 days long and covers camping, open canoeing, whitewater kayaking, sea kayaking, hiking, rock climbing, mountaineering, and wilderness first aid. In the US, and in many other countries,...


4

I like the answer of @Charlie Brumbaugh, and it would be hard to do better as an official answer, but I would like to add the perspective of one category of prospective client: The older, highly experienced but still healthy backpacker who now needs help with carrying stuff (Sherpa help -- I hope that does not minimize the important role Sherpas play on ...


3

When you just get started climbing there is a lot of things you can learn to improve your technique, and not all of it needs to come from climbing. Things you can do outside of the gym: Try watching bouldering competitions and watch how the climbers move, pay close attention to how and where they place their feet and how they shift their body weight. A ...


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