11

Customs may complain, but not likely. I'd make sure to pack it with your climbing gear, along with the chalk packaging. If customs suspect drugs, a simple test will confirm it for them. However, there's always the chance you'll get someone trying to make a name for himself, and give you a hard time. I had a friend who was stopped by police when he was ...


9

A few drops of baby oil (light nontoxic mineral oil) to suffocate the cockroach, then blunt tweezers or alligator forceps to carefully remove it once dead and motionless, if it is visible and easily grasped without rupturing the body of the roach or damaging the ear (don’t dig around blindly in the ear with any object). To prevent injury one should strongly ...


9

The short answer is - you can't do an expedition. It takes lots of time, money and effort to organize an expedition and requires experience. Your best bet for visiting the Arctic (anywhere above the Arctic circle) would be to either fly or drive. You can fly to Barrow, Alaska, or you can fly into Norway, Sweden, Denmark or Russia and then drive to Arctic ...


7

There's no way to answer this question without asking another - where on the Amazon do you intend to swim? This is the largest river system in the world, with the greatest outflow of any river - so big that it's bigger than the next 6 largest combined! It is generally accepted that it is the second longest. It starts somewhere deep in the Andes in the ...


7

The short answer is "not really". At least within the US, liquids with an alcohol content of 70% or greater are not permitted in checked bags or carry-on, and those are the most likely of the fuels you might have been able to get through. (Gasoline, kerosene, etc. are certainly not permitted.) You may wish to experiment using 65% ABV beverages ...


6

Short answer - if you have to ask, you most certainly shouldn't do it! The Simpson is regarded as one of the ultimate challenges for cross-country drivers. There are no easy routes, and the dangers are significant. You would need a high ground clearance 4WD vehicle, and also a great deal of skill and experience together with detailed research and planning. ...


6

Firstly, August is a good time to go to the Kruger park as it is winter and the day time temperature a bit more bearable than in mid summer (December). Also, winter is the dry season, so the vegetation is a bit reduced, making it easier to see into the bush; in summer the grass at the side of the road grows quite tall and can restrict visibility. As for the ...


5

If you are worried about wildlife, not very dangerous. Swim with other people and from a boat rather than from shore. Biggest threat is probably drowning. The major threats: Sting Rays – Purported by Smithsonian Zoo to inflict most injuries to people in Amazonian rivers. Considered docile, but will sting if stepped on as they bury themselves in the sand to ...


5

As @Tullochgorum said, the Simpson is a very dangerous area, but it certainly looks beautiful! It's broken down into many sections, and since I don't know your level of off-road driving, I wouldn't presume to tell you which would be best. Disclaimer: I'm not an off-road driver, and have never been on this kind of trip, so everything in this answer will be ...


4

I would avoid man-made fuel based stoves all together and just use a titanium wood burning stove. They are also great for areas were large fires are prohibited, but you just want the comfort of a very small well contained fire. They may not work well in some areas that are low on wood or other burnable resources (e.g. dry leaves, tinder, paper, etc.), or ...


4

If you don't have a shelter, then you want to find somewhere as safe as possible with solid walls surrounding you, at the core of your building. Garages don't usually fulfil this role, as while you may have solid walls, the door is easily ripped off by high winds combined with the pressure differential in a tornado. Additionally, if you are under a vehicle ...


4

What you certainly need: Water proof - well that's a must as your top outer layer. Make sure to not simply get something water resistant (like some soft shells), but pick a jacket that offers some proper protection against rain. Breathable - for hikes or even only when walking/biking your your home town breathability is key. Otherwise you'll simply get wet ...


3

I used to live in Washington state. There are similar regulations there. As Charlie says in his comment this is "legalese for mud flaps" For passenger cars it is integral to the cars design. Think about a logging truck or semi without a trailer. All those large tires (eight+) on a wet rainy and/or muddy road. The truck is in front of you and there is no ...


3

I would follow the advice of the Mayo Clinic. Remove the object if possible. If the object is clearly visible, pliable and can be grasped easily with tweezers, gently remove it. This is somewhat contentious advice since the general guidance for ears is to insert nothing smaller than your elbow. It is very easy to perforate the ear drum with tweezers and ...


3

Buy a ticket to Grise Fjord. That's pretty arcticy. (No plants bigger than mosses, lots of rock.) Ok more seriously, if you want to go on your own, you need to acquire some skills first. Backpacking A: Get good at backpacking. B: Now start camping above timberline. C: Now start camping above timberline in winter. Skiing A: Learn to cross country ski. B: ...


3

While an answer shows that takedown compounds have existed in the past, it's almost certain that they will never return. Instead, hunting compounds have opted to go for very short ATA(Axle to axle) lengths. This makes for a shorter bow, often 34" or less. Much less awkward than a 64" to 68" recurve. Modern compound limbs are very highly stressed even when ...


3

I've carried all my climbing gear when travelling as carry on with no problems in NZ, Australia, UK, and Europe - chalk and full trad rack included. For travel in Canada, I had it all in checked luggage with no issues. Cannot comment on other areas.


2

Fuels tend to be prohibited on commercial flights, by definition. There are a variety of solid fuel stoves which are popular with bushcrafters and day campers although these tend to be relatively heavy and bulky and rely on you being able to find suitable fuel at your campsite. Their major downside is that they may not be allowed in some areas depending on ...


2

If it is going to produce enough heat to cook a plane is going to have problems with it. A solid fuel is very stable and not likely to cause a problem. For sure don't cheat with a compressed gas like propane or butane that could go pissss at low pressure. A liquid fuel like white gas in a high end bottle is a safe bet but may still be confiscated. Put ...


2

Here's an old video of a Fred Bear Borsalino take-Down compound bow being taken down and put back together. There is also a Fred Bear TRX 32 take-down compound bow on ebay. I didn't see any of these during a quick look at their website, so I wonder if anything like this is currently in production.


2

Possibly, but I highly doubt it. The thing is that it's not that easy to restring a compound bow and most people would probably pay someone else to do it for them. Recurve bows are much easier to restring yourself and they do make takedown version of them. In theory one could do this by simply disassembling a regular compound bow with allen wrenches but it'...


2

The answer of @Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL is very comprehensive and is a must to read. The vehicle may be capable but the user isn't and that's the biggest problem with touring remotely. AWD vehicles can be mainly divided into 2, active and reactive. Active ones are AWD all the time (For example: Subaru AWD systems and Audi's). Reactive ones are everything ...


2

Malta, or more precisely Gozo, a small island right next to the main island, is a very well liked destination for divers within the EU. Friends of mine go there regularly.


2

The danger specifically of piranhas depends on the time of year. Around Manaus the water is high during the rainy season (October to March) and it may be ok to swim (bearing in mind bob1's answer). But during the dry season piranha's, especially in left over pools, may be hungry and dangerous. https://piranhaguide.com/a-documented-list-of-all-known-piranha-...


2

When faced with many different conditions, the main requirement you need to fill is versatility. My favorite pants, by far, are the ones from Fjällräven. They do what most good outdoors/trecking pants do these days: they dry very quickly, they are lightweight and comfortable to wear. But, in addition, they come with some very useful perks that I have ...


2

Definitely make certain it’s lightweight and waterproof. Protecting your down jacket from wet weather is essential. Wet down will not keep you warm. Armpit vents make it breathable and are helpful keeping you cool when active. This is the Northface rain jacket I’ve had for 12 years. They still make it and it’s still available. This jacket is still in great ...


2

There may be restrictions in tunnels or ferries. For example BC Ferries states Remember, all dangerous goods must be declared at the terminal ticket booth or to a vessel officer. Failure to declare dangerous goods is an offence under Canadian law. There follows a list. Dangerous Goods Commonly Encountered by BC Ferries . . . Propane: Propane ...


2

A 20lb Propane tank can be safely transported in your mini van. It can also be transported unsafely. Safely: up right, secured, ventilated, kept cool Unsafely: on its side, not tied down, un-ventilated, allowed to get warm The key is to keep it secured, upright, cool and ventilated. The problem becomes on a trip camping are you going to stop for potty ...


2

Storage methods for propane tanks: Ensure the area is well-ventilated Make sure that the tank is upright at all times Keep the surrounding temperatures low by avoiding direct sunlight during summer Avoid ignition source (lighters, matches, tinder, electric sparks, etc.) When you're transporting the tank: Leave the window or trunk slightly open to prevent ...


2

mogoman's answer is excellent, but I'll add some thoughts of my own after a visit to the park a few years ago. Personally, I'd recommend a week in the park. Given that your chances of having good encounters every morning/evening isn't guaranteed unless you take one of the buses driven by guides (in which case, you're on a bus with lots of other people and ...


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