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68

There are a number of different ways to do this. Method using GPS, compass and Google Earth. Get the GPS coordinates of where you can see the tree from. Take a bearing with a compass to the tree from that location and write it down. Move to another location a decent distance away from the first where you can also see the tree. Take another bearing with a ...


33

I'll answer this from a perspective of what we follow in some of the areca nut and coconut farms that I've grown up in. The areca nut and coconut trees shed their branches often. These are similar to the dead wood that you are speaking of in the woods. These too are a nuisance when it comes to walking around. So what we do is to move these to the base of ...


26

What you're asking to do is impossible to accomplish. The signs will never, "move outward with the tree as it grows". Trees don't grow like that. The reason trees have rings is because they grow layer-by-layer each season. If you tie a thread around a tree, the tree will not grow and break the thread, it will grow around it. Similarly, you're not going to ...


20

This is the old saying, "When leaves show their undersides, be very sure rain betides." From the farmersalmanac.com: The leaves of deciduous trees, like maples and poplars, do often to turn upward before heavy rain. The leaves are actually reacting to the sudden increase in humidity that usually precedes a storm. Leaves with soft stems can become ...


19

I think the Audubon Field Guides smartphone apps are fantastic. At least, they are a great improvement over the printed guides -- more species, more photos, lengthier descriptions, and smaller than the book. The apps help make identification relatively easy because you can search for trees in your region and leaf shape, for example, and get a smaller set of ...


17

All pines, spruces and firs have edible needles. All yews are poisonous, and can look like some of the above, so be careful you have identified the tree correctly!


15

It looks like a Burl. They are natural non-harmful (think of them like scar tissue maybe, resulting from injury or infection) deformities in the grain of trees. Both hardwood & softwood trees can develop burls. (FWIW, I'd guess based on the bark & needles laying in the folds of the bark in the first picture that this tree is some sort of conifer.)


15

I suspect that tree grew with something else twined around it. That something else has meanwhile died or been removed. Bittersweet is a likely candidate for what might have wound around the tree earlier in its life. There is more information on bittersweet in this question. I can't tell exactly what type of tree it is without seeing the leaves. However, ...


14

Yes, some sources create toxic smoke/fumes, notably: Oleander Rhododendron Poison Ivy (smoke can cause lung damage in some cases) I'm not sure of a comprehensive list, but be wary of any poisonous wood / shrub, it's probably more likely to burn toxic. As pointed out in the comment, unless you can identify vines well then it may be a good idea to stay away ...


14

Given that trees don't push outward, one option is to use lag bolts, and once a year two go around and turn them out a little bit so they are never engulfed in the growth. The amount of turning you'll need to do and the frequency will depend on the speed of growth and how secure you need the sign. If you can leave a half-inch out of the tree and have the ...


14

The answer seems to be that it depends, Birds, small mammals, and other wildlife use snags for nests, nurseries, storage areas, foraging, roosting, and perching. Live trees with snag-like features, such as hollow trunks, excavated cavities, and dead branches can provide similar wildlife value. Snags occurring along streams and shorelines eventually may ...


13

Moss grows best in the shade (and damp, but most relevant here is shade). Because of the curvature of the Earth, in the northern hemisphere the north side of trees is shadier than the south side, so if moss grows on only one side of a tree, it is likely to be the north side. In the southern hemisphere, the whole thing is mirrored so the moss is on the south ...


13

That was definitely a beaver. Nothing else has quite the chewing power of a beaver, for example accoring to Wikipedia, these trees were cut by beavers in a single night. Based on the color of those chips, I would say that you were there less than a week if not sooner from when the beaver was chewing the tree down. The reason that I don't think its a ...


13

That is a sweet gum tree. The distinctive compound fruit is hard, dry, and globose,1–1.5 inches (25–38 mm) in diameter, composed of numerous (40-60) capsules.[13] Each capsule, containing one to two small seeds, has a pair of terminal spikes (for a total of 80-120 spikes). When the fruit opens and the seeds are released, each capsule is associated with a ...


13

Take two compass bearings from two known GPS coordinates but different azimuths. Then just use the formula to calculate their intersection. Aviation Formulary -- Great Circle Navigation Formulae -- Intersection of two radials How to compute the latitude, lat3, and longitude, lon3 of an intersection formed by the crs13 true bearing from point 1 and ...


12

This usually means that they had a nest in the tree. If they are still there after a few days it probably means they also had young. Either still in the nest or young enough that they still returned to be fed.


12

Was it safe? Yes, you were not in any danger here (unless your tree was a Charlie Brown Christmas tree). Was it the best thing to do? No, for a couple of reasons, the most important being that it does not comply with leave not trace ethics, and can badly scar the tree. It's also no good for your rope, dragging your rope through dirt and sap can ...


12

Using some numbers from Cornell's Extension program: 10 gallons of sap per tap in a season is reasonable. The length of a season varies- Let's say it's 90 days. The sugar concentration, which influences how much syrup you get from a given volume of sap, varies. Let's assume 2%, which means you need 43 gallons of sap to get 1 gallon of syrup. So three taps ...


11

There are two important factors when bowmaking: Flexibiliy, i.e. how easy the wood is to bend Strength, i.e. how much force you can put into the wood before it breaks. If you are just interested in a toy bow that doesn't shoot to hard or far then flexibility is your main concern. You want thinnish green wood which tends to be the most flexible. If you ...


11

That tree got bent over but not snapped when it was just tall enough so that its tip was where the end of the bend is now. One of the small branches near that tip happened to point upwards after the bending. That branch basically became the new trunk. The existing bent wood stayed where it was, with layers added each year enlarging its diameter. Now 25 ...


11

Really the key to escaping tree wells is to ski/board/snowshoe with a buddy. I have friends who have ended up head down in a tree well, completely unable to reach their bindings. With every movement more snow would fill in the well. If they hadn't been skiing with a partner, it would have been a dire situation. Even with a partner it took a while to get them ...


10

Interesting question! Here is an article describing the techniques used by arborists. The article describes a number of different techniques and different pieces of gear. I'll describe one specific method, using cheap gear, that is based on techniques that I've used in rock climbing. Buy: a short length (maybe 20 m) of 9-10 mm static climbing rope a small ...


10

Coming from a heavy ranching area the method used for properly attaching fences to trees is to add a board in between. The board provides enough surface area and strength that instead of the tree growing around the nail it pushes it out .


10

I know that on the east coast, a couple of the park services have been pushing the climbing community to install bolt anchors as a replacement for nests of old slings around trees. This is in part because slinging anchors around trees can damage the bark, and sometimes eventually kill the tree. This shift from webbing anchors around trees to bolted rappel ...


10

You are probably finished with this project by now, but I'll weigh in with our experience for others searching for this answer down the road. We were wondering the same thing about how to attach horticultural signs to trees a couple of years ago. We manufacture interactive plant tags for trees and other plants and many of our users attach our larger signs ...


10

For the purpose of my answer I'm going to assume there aren't any special considerations like a tall tree on a small lot. In general I think this is the best procedure: Cut down one tree. Trim off all the branches. Build a big pile of small branches that aren't useful for firewood. a. Load this stuff into a trailer and dispose of it as appropriate when ...


10

Almost certainly, this is the work of a woodpecker foraging for grubs in a dead and rotting tree: they tend to move methodically up the trunk excavating at intervals, producing the Swiss cheese effect visible in your photo. This being Finland, your culprit is probably the black woodpecker Dryocopus martius. For comparison, here's a stock photo entitled "...


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