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38

Several years ago, I helped two men move a large turtle about 1,000 feet to a stream. They had been driving by and saw the turtle on the road, and saw me in my driveway. I got a hand-truck and a snow shovel. They slid the snow-shovel under the turtle and eased him onto the hand-truck. (I don't remember which end of the turtle went on the hand-truck.) ...


29

I've actually driven up to a very large (more than 1 foot across) snapping turtle. While it may not be the answer you want, you simply don't. Things I've tried: This is based on actual experience. Lift them from behind: While easy to run around behind them, it doesn't work. Little known fact, they can "leap" very small distances, easily out of your ...


24

There are a few possibilities: Other Turtles This site about pet turtles mentions the possibility that turtles fighting over a mate (or actually mating) may end up on their backs. When breeding season comes around, adult male turtles might start fighting over the females. A stronger male might flip a weaker one over. Male turtles might also harass ...


21

I know this question has been protected, but since I was invited in a comment to post an answer, especially about things that we shouldn't do, I'm going to add this. There is some great, as well as some very dangerous, advice in the existing answers and comments. Although this answer will have some redundancy with those, I'm not trying to take credit away or ...


15

The best way would be to get a thick stick of suitable length and let the snapper bite it. He likely will be stubborn enough to hang on while you drag him where you want him to go. When he is there, drop the stick and let him go on his way while you go yours.


13

The Sea Turtle Conservancy (STC) gives two reasons for keeping beaches dark at night when sea turtles are laying or hatching. The first reason the STC gives is that a nesting turtle likes quiet, dark beaches. If she cannot find such a spot after several attempts, she will choose a less than ideal spot to lay her eggs, and perhaps even lay them in the ocean. ...


12

Based on this list of turtles in Massachusetts, and this one as well as the pointed nose and the jagged back shell, I am going to say that this is a common snapping turtle. For more information I would suggest Wikipedia. It a good thing that you husband didn't touch it, because they are capable of biting (link has gross picture).


10

In addition to the reasons given in @John Hughes answer, Predators may be another cause. This SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment page on the longevity and causes of death of sea turtles lists tiger sharks and killer whales (orcas) as the main predators of adult turtles. This YouTube video (also featured, with additional notes, in this LiveScience.com ...


9

This is a common snapping turtle. It's not a tortoise. The biggest difference is that turtles are aquatic, spending most of their time in the water, while tortoises live on land. As for your other questions: Age: It's not easy to tell the age of the snapper. They reach full size between 8 and 10 years old. Adults measure from 9.5 to 14.5 inches (24 to 36 ...


8

Even though I have a relatively small car, I keep long handled snow brush like the one pictured below in my car all year round. The brush end can twist to make it more like a push broom. I've shooed snakes, turtles and geese out of the road with it. Turtles snapped it, snakes bit and, and geese honked at it, but it's still standing. The brush handle is about ...


8

There are a number of considerations here, so getting educated is the first step in responding to the Red Eared sliders. There could be positive and negative effects. Contact your local conservation department. They'll know how to proceed. If the species is native, you might want to protect it from domestic animals. On the other hand, if you protect it ...


6

This does look like some sort of turtle. Snapping turtles can easily get to the size you mention, and are fairly common. The picture doesn't give the impression the tracks are really 10 inches apart. They seem narrower than that, which would open the possibility for a number of other turtles. Box turtles get to a reasonable size, and then there are a ...


5

My research has shown that a common technique used to protect turtle nest to build a nest cage over the nest. A nest cage is basically just a wire/mesh cage without a bottom/floor that will prevent predators from accessing/digging up the eggs, while still allowing for the normal climate and weather (e.g. sunshine) to reach the nest - meaning don't build a ...


5

An early thaw can definitely be dangerous to some of the many varieties of painted turtles. However, according to the Ohio Division of Wildlife, you only have one breed of painted, which is the Midland Painted Turtle, Chrysemys picta marginata. There are several subspecies of painted turtles in the United States, but only the midland painted turtle ...


5

I've done this once with a medium sized turtle - it was probably about 18+ inches in diameter, and I guess 40 or so pounds. I took a sweatshirt from the trunk, threw it over the turtle's rear end, and lifted - it was too heavy and awkward for me to fully lift, but I got it about an inch of the ground. The turtle hissed and was cranky, but it was startled ...


4

Contrary to some other answers here, you should be able to just pick it up from behind by the shell, though you need some considerable strength to do so for larger turtles. To see this being done many many times without injury to the turtles you can view the videos of Coyote Peterson available on YouTube. He has suffered injury from the turtles, but not ...


2

It looks like it can be harmful for the turtles. Even the healthiest turtle may come out of hibernation too soon and be caught above ground by a spring snowstorm and perish. Many wild box turtles are eaten by foraging animals as they sleep, or freeze to death because they didn’t find satisfactory winter dens. Source Owner Joy Bloor said: "To hibernate ...


2

I would use a shovel. Just pick it up gently and set him/her down on the other side.


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