23

Fastpacking is lightweight or ultralight mountain travel with the aim of covering big distances over extended trips. Base weights would typically range between 8lbs-15lbs (3.5-7kg) or even less, so packs should be light enough to enable at least some of the trail to be covered with a running gait. There's a lot of emphasis on using your skills and experience ...


20

I would say... never. What is a tarp but something that keeps precipitation off of you. In humid summer months, sure, condensation can cause precipitation under the tarp, but in winter, this is not so much a concern, and you can pitch it lower to the ground. You might get frost inside - but just shake it off when you pack up. Tents provide a few degrees ...


19

I wouldn't buy an ultralight tent if you're going to put the tent through severe trauma or require significant space (e.g. to use chairs inside). I do think the main difference in buying is cultural; unless you are poking it with sticks tents shouldn't experience that much damage. The modern ultralights should be good for most any weather outside of ...


15

That's one gigantic backpack! Let's look at it item by item: Tent: Your hillberg is pretty light by several standards, but indeed far from ultralight. Of course the Big agnes is lighter, and there are alternatives that are much lighter, and also cheaper than that, but you do need a tent that matches the conditions. I would not use a tarp in Quebec in ...


14

The most obvious thing is an emergency blanket. It will add a lot of extra insulation per gram. It'a good to have one in you bag on any trip. However, a mere blanket is definitely not enough for all seasons, elevations and weather conditions. When planning at home, you should ask yourself a question: "What will happen to me if I have to be on the route ...


14

In general the more stuff you have the more comfortable you can make yourself when you aren't hiking, but the less comfortable you'll be when you are hiking. This is the crux of the balancing act. If you bring a big comfy reclining "camping chair" strapped to your pack you'll be very comfortable sitting in camp but miserable when you are lugging the ...


12

Your best bet is going to be small mylar pouches (any other thick plastic you can get your hands on will probably work just as well). They hold up much better than flimsy freezer bags and have a thick reassuring seal on the edge. You can get them resealable as shown, or you can weld non resealable bags closed. What you're really going for is something like ...


11

I always take a fist-sized SOL emergency bivy bag and a couple of strong black garbage bags. That way you can stuff food and even your body in the bags when conditions are cold and wet. I have also converted a garbage bag into a spare insulating clothing layer by tearing holes for arms and legs. Essential for climbers are a whistle for signalling and a ...


11

I do a lot of strength training when not backpacking, and try to keep my protein up around ~140 grams per day, on average. I asked a related question over on the fitness.stackexchange.com site, and at this point make all my own meals (usually with my dehydrator) because I find pre-made-hiker-food to be junk. The lightest protein source I know of is simply ...


10

I would say it's not a question of too cold, tents don't add that much warmth. Tarps and a shovel can make some very nice shelters in the snow. The real limitation is blowing snow/rain and the wind speed you expect to stand. If the wind is shifting at all, or is much above 20 mph, a tarp is going to be fairly miserable. ( I'm not including floorless tents ...


10

I have bought the Copper Spur 3 and slept in it now on a cottage lawn and on a backcountry campsite. The advantages (lightweight, easy to set up) are real. There are some disadvantages that I have not seen mentioned in the other answers, so I've decided to add an answer providing them. None of these are enough to make me regret buying the tent or tell ...


9

I see an ultralight tent as an expensive piece of backpacking equipment, with the alternative being a tarp. Compared to the tarp, the tent is slightly heaver, much more expensive, easier to set up, and keeps out bugs. I'm ready to buy one but hang on, why do they still make regular tents? What's the downside here? I would assume that the vast majority of ...


9

If you want a tent that has value for money, don't buy lightweight. If you want a tent that is going to stay waterproof for years and years, don't buy lightweight. If you want a tent that isn't going to break the bank, don't buy lightweight. If you really need the performance and the weight saving, i.e. you will be spending a lot of time carrying it ...


9

Your most practical solution would seem to be a wing shelter. For the most part, you simply need your tarp, a tree, sticks and rope. The pdf I attached recommends making it 5 feet tall, but you could easily make it 2 or 3 feet tall to accommodate the length you need the shelter to be.


9

When you start packing lighter, usually it comes with smaller margins of error. It seems that it is typically your case here. Basically, the first thing is to be more careful. It is a habit to take. For example, when you couldn't find information about whether there was deep wet snow or not, the decision of not taking the snowshoes was maybe arguable. ...


8

Cuben fiber is not as durable as some other materials used in the construction of backpacking gear. In backpacking lighter often means less durable which is generally true for cuben fiber as well. A cuben fiber backpack will probably hold for 2000 miles (e.g, a thru-hike) but not much more. For this reason, there is now a hybrid cuben/nylon material which is ...


8

The most pressing points are good ground insulation(mat to lie down on) wind protection and then dry clothes. We lose 80% of body heat through the ground. Evaporation of sweat or humid clothes cool at an extremely fast rate too. The amount of heat transfer depends on the evaporation rate, however for each kilogram of water vaporized 2,257 kJ of energy are ...


8

Yes, you can use an emergency blanket as a substitute for most of a tarp's uses, but as you suspect it's not going to be as durable. The Mylar that they're made of is surprisingly tough and I doubt that it would rip or tear, but I would expect it to develop plenty of very small punctures and begin to lose its aluminum coating (possibly making a glittery ...


7

Down is the lightest and most compressible delivering the best warmth. Down is the undercoating of water fowl. It provides the greatest amount of dead air space of any insulation material for its weight. A down pod consists of light, fluffy filaments that grow from one quill or point. These filaments intertwine and mesh, forming air pockets which trap air. ...


7

I would use a simple emergency bivy bag, a butt-pad (short sleeping pad) (thermarest, exped), some extra socks, buff and then you can sleep in all your clothes on the pad in this bag. this should work for emergency, it's not the best comfort but it works in 3 season conditions. For more comfort you can use a light silk liner in your bivy bag. All this ...


7

I have three tents, including an ultralight Big Agnes Fly Creek 2. The others are dome tents, including a Eureka Tetragon 2 and a Big Agnes four man tent. The Fly Creek is extremely light, but I only ever use it backpacking when I'll be the only one in it. It is too small to hang out in comfortably during extended bad weather, and there is only enough head ...


7

I'd cut my brush shorter long before I'd take the time to try drilling it. But If I was serious about going ultra light, I wouldn't pack a normal/modified toothbrush at all, I'd take a finger brush, either a reusable one: Or some disposable ones: I used to keep a couple brush-ups in my bag, they work ok, but honestly you could probably achieve the same ...


7

You can in a pinch, but not what it is made for. Won't last very long at all and will make a ton of noise. Get a piece of Tyvek and cut it to size. Cheap, light and durable. Can't beat it.


6

OK, I finally tried the setup inspired by this site, which can be fully closed by pegging the sides closer to the middle, and pegging it directly on the ground on the opposite side of the entrance. It would be quite a tight night and you would need to leave your rucksack out, if it's big. But I was able to put the sleeping bag out of the bag from the ...


6

Tenting with two people always comes down to a few items. How easy is it to get in/out? Is there enough room to fit both people and gear? How much does this thing weigh? Can we afford it? You've ruled out the cost. Given that all three tents have two doors, getting in and out should be equivalent. So it comes down to balancing weight vs. space. The ...


6

These three tents are very similar; freestanding, double-wall dome construction. The limelight is a bit heavier with more floor space. The trail light does not have a transversal pole. Any of them should do just fine. I used a similar tent, the MSR Hubba Hubba, for a while and was quite satisfied with the design. I now retired the Hubba Hubba in preference ...


6

I think anaheim brought up a lot of good points, but I would choose a super light biwi bag that is able to keep you dry whether the humidity comes from the inside (sweat) or the outside (rain). If I take an insulation mat with me depends on existing possibilities to use it. If there are no pedestals you can lay or sit on, I would leave it at home.


6

I used to sleep some times in the Belgium Ardennes which have a very mild climate. For size, weight and especially cost reasons I used agricultural black plastic (don't know the official English term). I used it like a tent replacement; I had a simple sleeping bag but in case of emergency it can be used also as replacement for that (depending on the ...


6

I would probably use a small tupperware or similar, something like this. You can also get ones where the lid clips down which are probably more secure. If you are concerned about it leaking/coming open I would use some elastic bands to secure the lid and store it in a separate freezer bag to contain any leaks. Using a freezer bag as you suggest may work, ...


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