The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
80

To answer my own question. I checked it with different dealers and experts, and all of them told that if I want to use it on regular basis, I should consider inflatables as toys. Also here in Switzerland it counts as flotation device and is not allowed more than 150 meters offshore. I bought myself a hardshell kayak for about 300$ more and next Monday I ...


28

In Canada, at least, we do distinguish between kayaks and canoes, and those are the words I'll use for the contrast here. To first make sure there's no confusion, have a look at the articles in wikipedia: "A kayak is a small, relatively narrow, human-powered boat primarily designed to be manually propelled by means of a double bladed paddle. The ...


18

White caps are named for the white caps at the top of waves. White caps are sign that the wind is picking up and that the weather conditions are getting worse and look like this at low wind levels. Source By the Beaufort scale these start happening at between 7-10 knots. Its even more dangerous if you are in a canoe as the wind can flip you. Wind and ...


13

Care for your neoprene water shoes as you would for any neoprene wetsuit. http://scubadiverlife.com/2011/03/15/scuba-wetsuit-care-101-removing-odors-extending-suit-life/ You can use any search engine and search for 'wetsuit soap' or 'wetsuit wash' and will find suitable products. Stop by any dive shop where you are travelling and they will likely have some....


13

As well stated in another answer, whitecaps (the white tips of waves) are a visual indicator of local wind speed over the water. Just wanted to add emphasis that whitecaps, as an indicator of wind, will often appear before the local formation of the sort of short, steep waves (aka “wind chop”) that can be challenging for canoes and kayaks paddled by people ...


11

Here are some things I've noticed in my relatively limited snorkeling experience: Fins with straps are quite annoying. The strap never really holds well, and you already have enough problems being awkward with fins on that you want them to at least be secure. An open toe will allow them to drain when you get out and the vent makes them easier to get on and ...


11

Let's start with the easy one first: No fins - this really only works with a long board, as the board's length gives it the stability a fin would normally give you. You aren't going to be able to tackle short, steep waves like this. 1 fin - gives lift when surfing, as the water in the face of the wave is rising. Otherwise you slip down the face of the wave. ...


10

Paddles board sizing are relative to what you wish to do with said board. Short boards 8' or under are generally used for children. Medium boards 9' to probably around 12' are good for calm lakes / rivers and for some fun in the surf. Long boards, 12' or more are for the more serious journeys, touring or racing. They are faster and track straighter. ...


10

The first thing to understand is that fins are not strictly necessary snorkeling gear; I've often snorkeled without them. Fins compensate for not using hands while swimming. If you have an underwater camera and/or anticipate strong currents, you'll want to use fins in order to help you propel yourself along under water. Even if these don't apply, having fins ...


9

For the US, an excellent starting point would be the Coast Guard's Aids to Navigation brochure; it explains all of the markers you are likely to encounter and provides a brief overview of the "rules of the road". The Coast Guard's Navigation Rules Online is an unofficial merger of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS) and ...


9

1.) I would be hesitant to advise you to put them in the dryer. I've never tried or experienced it myself, and my evidence is completely anecdotal, but I've heard that the neoprene has the potential to turn brittle if exposed to forced heating. 2.) The two main things to consider when drying out gloves like this (as well as other things like boots, socks, ...


8

The big difference between canoeing and kayaking is the cargo capacity. Kayaks might have small hatches to store gear in, otherwise you're stuck with what you can lash onto the top of the kayak (or stuff down from the cockpit). Whereas canoes are the pick-up truck of the backwoods and you can have a level of great luxury, rivaling car-camping. Want a proper ...


8

I don't have specific numbers on strength and durability, but I have had both and repaired both rather often. I work with a scout troop that has currently 22 floating canoes. The protector we put on both is the same, the hole repair method is the same the only real difference is when you dent or completely wrap the Royalite canoe around a rock. With the ...


7

Sounds like what you're looking for is either an undersuit, or simply some swimming pants/tights. Wetsuit undersuits are worn under diving wetsuits to add insulation and comfort to the suit, and they help slide the suit on and off a bit easier, some are essentially built like a body-rashguard. Swim tights are exactly what they sound like, tight pants that ...


7

I know very about kitesurfing, so I did some research on it. Please look at some of the resources I used instead of taking what I say for granted. I hope that I can provide a simple baseline, and those who know more or want to know more can continue the process. Most of the information below is summarized, paraphrased, or quoted from this site: www....


7

Cotton kills - but only when not in water. Whilst in water, cotton will not have any thermal effect. However, the material itself can easily wear you down through drag. You might be able to swim short distances, but longer ones - depending on your fitness - can slow you down considerably through drag. Elite swimmers will wear suits with soft and flowing ...


6

I'm sure there is lots of useful info out there but I recently watched this short film on Korduroy tv on fin design that I found very informative. The film discusses the notion that changing your fin setup can significantly change the way your board performs e.g. a fin that is more vertical with more surface area than one that is swept-back will pivot more ...


6

Rinsing them in clean water when you are finished using them will definitely help stop them smelling. To deal with the current smell I would just leave them in a sink/bucket of clean water for a couple of hours/overnight. I wouldn't worry too much about drying them as long as they are cleaned. As you said using soap is not a a good idea unless you get ...


6

The abilities required are developed through practice and mostly focus on three areas: increasing the oxygenation capability of the body retraining autonomic apnoea responses minimising the metabolic requirements through lowering heart rate etc Resisting the increasing pressure is, surprisingly, not as much of an issue as you may think. Yes, getting used ...


5

I scuba dive with dozens of divers who exclusively used Viking drysuits. The photo you have shows a similar drysuit, though not as heavy duty. After about a dozen or two dives, each one of the drysuit wussesdivers would be cutting and pulling out a glove or boot and installing a new one. The seals around the wrists and ankles are their worst aspect and ...


4

From the coasteering excursions I and my family have been on in Scotland, the rest of the UK and some other European countries, there appears to be no consistent grading. What I have seen is use of common grading for the climbing parts plus usually a comment on the "relative danger" on the drop to water and swimming sections. This commentary may have height ...


4

It looks like the gear you need is what is called a "sit ski" Individuals that are unable to stand will ski using a “sit ski,” which comes in a variety of sizes from wide, stable skis to narrow, competitive skis. “Probably 80 percent of our students use a sit-down water ski that was designed by Royce Andes, one of our instructors,” says Haakon Lang-...


4

Seems like standing on conventional skis is out if cannot stand. There actually is a disabled skiing category. There is specialty equipment and I bet as least one ski camp that caters to the category. Mainstream related to water skiing is knee boarding. You don't have to stand and also the pull is not nearly has hard. It is harder to get up than you ...


4

The sock would have been glued in there, yes. In service the socks and the wrist seals would have been replaced often as they didn't last long. Now you can glue either booties, the latex socks or just an ankle seal.


4

Apart from what all options suggested by other users here, If you are up for investing a bit, You might want to look out for Neoprene shampoos that are used by Scuba Divers to clean their Scuba suits. The Bacteria and the stinking has a close relation. The other way to go is Vinegar with water. A bucket of water with 2-3 tablespoons of vinegar should do. ...


4

In general most buoys and navigational marks are informational. (There are some that could mark prohibited or restricted areas, but those are rare) Mostly they are of the “you are here” or “shallow water past this point” variety. The “you are here” type can be helpful if fog, rain etc. reduce visibility before you get back to shore. The “shallow water past ...


4

Definitely do it, you can make enormous progress in 4 days! But take safety seriously in the ocean: Buy your own leash and carefully check that the connection to the rental surfboard is very secure. If you are anything but a very experienced swimmer then becoming separated from your surfboard in the ocean may be an unpleasant or dangerous experience. I’...


3

Every boat is different, and every crew is different. There is no set standard. Some people go single-handed on a ketch, some have fairly large crew. Bernard Moitessier used to sail a 39-foot ketch single-handed and with his wife.


3

Since most high-tech fins are made for scuba diving, you may want to consider wearing small 1.5mm neoprene dive booties with dive fins. This eliminates several issues with: fin straps falling off your heels chafing / blistering around your fins where they rub the skin toes getting compressed in your fin in order to get a snug fit. low selection ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible