Hot answers tagged

75

There's an abandoned quarry near me where local kids used to jump off the topmost cliff edge, 100 feet up, every summer. When done properly it is survivable without injury. You have to break the surface tension with a part of your body that can take the blow, and you have to keep all your muscles clenched and your body absolutely rigid, and you have to hit ...


44

Life jackets do not make one drownproof, just increase your odds significantly. Our data also show that over 80% of drowning victims were NOT wearing life jackets when found. We know from other data that most of those victims could have been saved had they been wearing a life jacket before the mishap occurred. But, you ask, what happened to the ...


41

In the specific case you mention, both the NY Post and Deutsche Welle say that the cause of death is still being investigated, and both of them point out the low water temperature (the victims were kayaking in a glacier lake). DW mentions that they were not wearing any protection against cold water. At the time of writing, hypothermia seems more likely than ...


38

As a former soldier (and Medic), I personally don't flavour my water during the outdoors. The contents of the canteen/flask might be required for a non-drinking purpose such as: Eyewash Rinsing Medical Cleaning etc However, I do flavour my water on a day-to-day basis for the gym etc using super-concentrate micro capsules such as Squash'd If you have ...


37

There are these types of dry-bags that float and are combined with a leash and waist band. They are often marketed as primarely a "safety buoy", as they provide you with visibility, which is definitely a nice thing if there are boats around. Many of them just have a small pouch for keys/wallet/phone, but there exists variants with much more capacity. ...


37

You can place an empty cup in the middle of a lightly filled bucket of sea water. You then place a plastic bag over the bucket, with a stone in the middle so it has a dip in it over the cup. The sea water evaporates, reforms on the plastic bag (without any salt in it) and then drips into the cup. Slow but far better than drinking sea water.


36

Salt dissolves in water so will pass though a normal filter or cloth. You can try that with a coffee filter at home. So there's definitely an error in the article. A still (i.e. distillation apparatus, whether solar or fire-heated) is the only easily improvised way to desalinate water, but the article I read said he caught and ate fish - that will provide ...


32

This is nothing to worry about. Visiting the doctor won't accomplish anything if you don't have any symptoms of illness. In the case of giardia, which is the organism that is the biggest worry in popular perception, there's about a 25% chance that you already had it in your gut and were just asymptomatic. People often acquire it when changing diapers. ...


29

Even though the question describes a hypothetical and unlikely situation I think it has some merits as it is somewhat relevant for SCUBA diving also: it describes an emergency uncontrolled SCUBA ascent (swimming or buoyant). Note that the answer below assumes an absolute emergency only that requires an immediate no-air ascent. As in, you either reach the ...


25

Don't fill the container You can't win in a battle against the laws of physics. Water expands when it freezes, so you need to leave some room in your bottle for it to expand into. What I find works best is to fill your bottle just over half, then freeze it on its side. This will give the ice more room to expand than if you freeze it upright. When you grab ...


25

Let's say you lose 2 liters of water per day. To replace 2 liters of water by eating fish, you need to eat, for example, 2,500 g of cooked Pacific cod, which, besides water, also contains 500 g of protein and 3.4 g of sodium. Consuming 3.4 g of sodium (8.5 g of salt) per day is not that much; some people consume it on a daily basis. I calculated (from here) ...


23

First and foremost: Don't Panic At 30m, you'll be fine if you can free yourself within about 20 minutes and know what you're doing. That being said, there is a good chance you won't know your exact depth, so the sooner the better is going to be your guiding principle. (At 40m, your time drops to 8 minutes. At 20m, you have 45 minutes.) PADI and NAUI both ...


22

Feet first is always best - you might break your legs if you hit the bottom, but at least you won't break your back, neck, or be knocked unconscious - all of which can kill you, either through the damage to the spine or through drowning. I would aim to jump in angled away from the cliff (i.e. body not totally vertical), arms across chest or covering mouth/...


20

At the risk of stating the obvious... ... just not letting your paper get wet in the first place is by far the easiest and cheapest solution. How you might ask? These solutions worked well for me in the past: Use a map pouch for maps, papers, notes etc that you'll need to read often, but not edit/write on. There exist plenty of options, most are water ...


20

The best thing you can do to both ward off illness, and catch any illness so it can be treated early, is to schedule an appointment with your doctor, soon. When you request the appointment, make sure you mention drinking untreated creek water as the reason for the appointment. That will give your doctor time to look up references to the appropriate ...


19

PFDs come in various flavours: The best ones have sufficient floatation around the neck, and enough more flotation on the front compared to the back, than an unconscious victim is naturally rotated onto his back with is face out of the water. The classic design is the "Key hole" design. This is what you find in the lockers on ferries and passsenger ships. ...


17

The solution to this problem is waterproof paper. You can get it in notebooks, journals, legal sized for printing maps or documents etc. I have also seen at least one organization that had their instructor manuals printed on it. Some waterproof paper can be used with pencils, regular pens, and waterproof pens, while some only work with pens. The advantage ...


16

Instead of using the branch as a pulley, lift the bag into position with one hand while pulling the slack out of the rope with the other. If the bag is too heavy to lift over your head with one hand, have a second person pull the rope while you lift the bag with both hands. This will greatly reduce the friction on the tree limb.


14

Well, first thing first, 100' (30 metre) is likely not to end well for you. So really the question stops being valid way before that. Second, if you've ever spent anytime diving and had the pleasure of a bellyflop, you know you don't want to put yourself into any kind of uncontrolled tumble, and that means minimizing your rotation from your starting ...


14

Using anatolyg's idea of the carabiner, I think this will work. Thank you Anatolyg!


13

Until you got to "shorts and T shirt" I'd have said a waterproof belt bag. I've used them kayaking (on the rare occasions when it's warm enough to go without a drysuit or at least dry-cag in the UK) and for swimming in the sea/lakes/rivers. They'll hold a decent wallet, phone and keys without much effect on your swimming. If possible, avoid trying to take ...


12

Few things I do: bring tea. bring water flavoring packets, like Crystal Light or Propel. bring coffee or instant coffee. know your surrounding vegetation and make tea out of different plants, leaves, and/or roots. Emphasis on knowing your surrounding vegetation; make sure you know which plants (or parts of plants) are suitable for consumption.


12

Always surface dive/snorkel first. I have cliff dived in two locations - one is normally deceptive: poor visibility, shadows etc but on visual checks turned out to have 100 ft straight down to a sandy floor; the other looked clear and deep but had rocky ledges at about 20 feet! Considering we dived from 80 - 100 feet, that second location was scary! ...


11

I cut new growth back and stick the dripping ends in a container. Sap collects quickly and after filtering through a coffee filter it is absolutely clear and tastes refreshing. Never had any health problems from it and the grapevine doesn't even notice as it's a huge vine. Stay away from the main shoots and just nip the new growth back. The vine actually ...


11

I think the answer is highly personal, as an avid coffee-drinker, hot is for me what scalding might be for someone else. But if I am to give some kind of benchmark, I would say 45°C is a pretty good temperature to aim for. Not as hot as to scald your mouth, but hot enough to give you some warmth if drank in sufficient quantities. But if you want to carry "...


11

As someone with +10 years experience as a boy scout, I have never had an incident or heard of an incident where cooking with wilderness water led to bacteria infections, sickness, etc. You should take care not to use stagnant water (this was also mentioned in other answers) and I'd personally avoid very shallow streams, to avoid dirt and bacteria from the ...


11

Make a figure-8-on-a-bight knot on the center of your rope; clip a carabiner into the knot. Clip the center of a second rope into the carabiner. Toss your first rope over the tree branch using the original method. Use the second rope to raise the bag, using the carabiner as a pulley. To reduce friction, you can add a real pulley to the carabiner if you have ...


10

I have found that soda pop bottles are designed for higher pressure and don't deform as badly. Plus they are cheap to replace. In general a soda pop bottle filled to just the start of the shoulder won't break. Water freezes from the top down. In a tall bottle, water freezing at the top gets a grip on the sides, and so as the water freezes down, the ...


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