12

It sounds like you need your very own wetsuit, preferably one that is made for cold waters. Not sure if you can be too warm in a wetsuit, honestly, I am not an expert in this, but you definitely need a warmer one than an average person in a particular water temperature. And if you rent a wetsuit from a diving school, you get whatever they have available. You ...


9

Wet suit thickness is a very personal thing. I for instance dive in a 3mm shorty in 15C and higher and 3mm one piece for temperatures under 15C and above 6C Remember that you can also layer. So I would say a Dry Suit with thick under garment or a 7mm wet suit with a 3mm chicken vest underneath. Some nice thick gloves and hood and if you really cold then ...


8

You do not want a 6-7mm wetsuit for spring canoeing, you'd have trouble moving freely in it, and you would overheat very easily. They use 7mm wetsuits for arctic diving. I surf and swim in glacier lakes using a 4-3mm wetsuit (4mm torso, 3mm arms and legs). For paddling especially you want the extra mobility. Paddling with 3mm neoprene on your arms is ...


7

As an answer that will be of immediate use without investing a lot of money: You can wear two wetsuits, one over the other. I have done this in the past when the rental place couldn't provide a warm enough one in my needed size. It will restrict your mobility a little, so this is certainly not an optimal solution - but it's cheap, and you can probably ask ...


6

Consider a semi-dry suit. Here is a description of one from Scuba Doctor: Semi-dry suits are effectively a thick wetsuit with better-than-usual seals at wrist, neck and ankles. The seals limit the volume of water entering and leaving the suit. The wearer gets wet in a semi-dry suit but the water that enters is soon warmed up and does not leave the ...


6

Always check used wetsuits for wear, especially around seams, under arms, between the legs, and the seat. These areas typically wear through fastest, and although they are often strongest (extra stitching and padding) they take a lot of punishment. Check internal stitching carefully, as well as any patching. When done well, patches can last a long time, but ...


4

I cannot say this for all brands - as with any clothing item brands have different versions of sizing. I can be an 8 in one store but a 12 in another, go figure. I'm looking at Rip Curl as they had a great size chart. You'll have a few factors here as having the incorrect wetsuit size can lead to a few issues like chaffing, too much gap means the wetsuit ...


4

First, consider what design of wetsuit you want. As a (casually) competitive kayaker I use a 2mm longjohn wetsuit in winter with a thermal rash vest (or two if it's really cold) and a waterproof if it's very windy. Sometimes that's too warm for a proper training day, even in the depths of (UK) winter. For casual, whitewater or touring use I wear an extra ...


4

Positive buoyancy is useful in a swimming wetsuit as it reduces drag by lifting the swimmer in the water. Less swimmer in the water, less drag to overcome, so the swimmer can be faster for the same effort. Swimming wetsuits will also have a smooth covering to further reduce the drag. Typical triathlon wetsuits will also control the buoyancy in different ...


4

I thought I would weigh in with the other method you mentioned. Drysuits. You would need to take a course to use it safely, there is more to it than diving in a wetsuit. As someone who primarily dives in a drysuit, they are worth the effort of learning. Now to the aspects of the actual suit. The issue will be cost. Both for a course and the suit itself. The ...


3

Neoprene is not a good idea - unless circumstances dictate it necessary. It doesn't breathe well, it has a tendency to gnaw. It has a relatively high friction towards other textiles, so you'll have to work harder to move. And it doesn't isolate as well as alternatives, though it has some isolating properties. It is rough and tough, so I think it will be ...


2

Given your purpose, I would choose a surfing suit. They tend to run much cheaper than scuba suits as their purpose is different. They also tend to have more generous room in the arms and shoulders. Above all else fit is key to wet suit purchase. Life can be a bit hellish in a suit that does not fit correctly. That is one reason I would not buy used. ...


2

It's a question of the right tool for the job. For diving in temperatures below 14 degrees Celcius, a drysuit is best. When diving below 7 degrees a wetsuit really isn't the right tool for the job and is dangerous as you'll be extremely cold and will suffer on the surface. Even diving a 7mm wetsuit with a shortie over the top still isn't sufficient when ...


2

Use a drysuit. These insulate, are far warmer than a wetsuit and are an additional source of buoyancy. Two varieties, neoprene & 'membrane'. Typically neoprene is cheaper so your first drysuit is neoprene then you move on to membrane. To cut to the chase: membrane means there's little insulation, but there's hardly any evaporation so it's much ...


2

Wet suits are the perfect example of the name matching the application: they are intended to be wet. They do provide a thermal insulation although your body is in contact with water. However, this isolation is limited. Cold water will drain heat from your body faster than your body can produce if the water is cold enough. It depends on the ability of your ...


2

This sort of thing is a common problem with wetsuits. Different brands fit very differently. Fit is fairly important for swimming as a gap at the upper chest can end up like a scoop, adding drag and failing to keep you warm. Squeezing in too much in any dimension will shorten the life of the wetsuit, and may restrict movement; in marginal cases it might feel ...


1

In the Falklands, because the water is so cold as it comes up off the Antarctic peninsula, I always wore 6mm wetsuits even for kayaking. The two solutions we used were: talc. Yes, it gets wet, but really helps with seals round wrists and ankles a friend and solidly rooted poles or bars. Much easier to peel someone else out of a thick wetsuit.


1

Last winter I tried cycling in a 3mm sleeveless wetsuit (I was on the way to swim in a river, and thought I'd save getting changed beforehand). The air temperature was a little above freezing, and it turned out to be very warm and sweaty riding in neoprene. Apart from that it wasn't uncomfortable to wear. Perhaps it was a little constricting on the joints, ...


1

By a strange coincidence, your Question and the September/October Technology Review arrived today, with an article titled Super Suit. When divers carry out rescue missions in frigid waters, standard wetsuits offer less than an hour’s protection. The Navy and researchers who work in polar waters have long sought ways of extending that survival time. ...


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