Hot answers tagged

21

Use your ears. OK, Let me explain that. But first things first. The direction of the wind is what we call “downwind”. If I throw a handful of white flour into the wind, the direction that flour travels is “downwind”. The breeze picks up the scent of nearly everything it touches and carries that scent along wherever it goes. Like the white flour, but on a ...


18

Depends on where you set it, where I'm from the wind is almost always the determining factor, when you're in thick trees and wind isn't a factor, then you set your tent wherever it fits. Which direction you're facing depends on the terrain and your exposure. When we went camping a couple weeks ago, we set one of our tents up specifically to take advantage ...


18

If the wind is blowing from all directions, then you need to get as low as possible to the ground. Do your best to find a spot that is somewhat sheltered from the wind. The lee of a crest usually works, but if you have wind blowing from all directions then try to find a recess in the ground - a low spot where the ground that slopes up in all directions away ...


14

The suds are caused by protein. Protein is usually consumed by the nitrogen cycle and finally plant life, but if there is enough water churning by wind and white caps and breaking waves it can froth up and dry out and get blown away and get trapped a gyre where is eventually melts back down into the water. Sometimes it gets blown into a beach as you've seen. ...


11

Conditions in which you can handle the boat depend on the style of boat and the paddler The range of what defines a "covered cockpit kayak" includes play boats from under 2 meters to over 5 meter touring and racing boats. A considerably greater variety than "open canoe" covers. Paddlers range from total novices to the highly experienced ...


9

Wind directions are always given as the direction the wind is coming from. It would be natural for surf reports to do the same. This is born out by looking at Surfline surf reports for the West coast of North America. Surf is invariably reported as have a direction of somewhere in the western half of the compass - W, NW, SW etc. (excluding the 'inner' ...


8

I grew up around sailboats and live on an island. I have always heard the word "foundering" used to describe a boat taking on water and sinking. I have heard the word "flounder" used in connection with boats in less serious trouble. A discussion of the usages can be found in Merriam-Webster: When something founders, it loses its ...


8

With luck and planning I would assume in mountainous/timbered areas you would be able to setup your tarp so one of the open sides of your tent were mostly/partially blocked by a tree/rock/bush/etc. which would solve roughly half of your problem. After that it is about accepting the limitations of your tarp tent, or deciding that you want more reliable ...


8

What you are probably going to want to do is to build your own shelter out of rocks. Basically, you are going to want to pile them up into a wall a couple of feet high and get down behind that. If you know the direction the wind is coming from then you can make a horseshoe shaped shelter with the open side facing downwind. Then you will want to get in and ...


7

By the Beaufort scale if would be over level 8, Level 7: 50-61 km/h, 32–38 mph: Inconvenience felt when walking against the wind. Level 8: 62-74 km/h, 39–46 mph: Twigs break off trees; generally impedes progress Source Or from the National Weather service levels, A Wind Advisory means that sustained winds of 30 mph for one hour and/or frequent gusts of at ...


7

Simply the easiest way is to light a match (or light a stick from your fire), and look at which way the small flame blows. Simpler still (but less.. uhh.. 'classy'?) take some leaves from the ground, hold them up high, let them fall, and note the direction. Whichever you choose, do it a few times, and in a few different spots around your site. I would also, ...


7

The answer and reasoning I've heard is place the door facing upwind, or South / Southeast, as this is where the warmer winds tend to come from, northerly winds being colder. Face it east to wake up by the sunrise. Note, this is regarding the Northern Hemisphere, but the same logic can be applied for the Southern one.


7

Wet your finger in your mouth, then hold it straight up. It will feel noticeably cooler on the upwind side.


6

When wind is guaranteed but rain is unlikely you might decide the extra weight is worth it. But good layering with a hard shell that is breathable and has underarm zips can be quite comfortable while saving you the weight of the soft shell. This is my preferred option as the times I get too hot are generally when it's raining. Wind blocking fleece is an ...


6

You pitch the door downwind to help prevent blowing rain/snow from entering when you go in and out. Orienting the shelter to prevailing/expected winds is even more important for those of us that use tarps rather than tents. We don't have a door per se, but have less coverage so need to make sure we take wind into consideration when pitching it.


6

How can I tell which way is down wind? How do I know which way is down wind? I turn so the wind is coming around me from the back and is equal on both right and left sides. I feel it in my hair, on my face, and on exposed arms and legs. If the direction is variable, use an average direction. Is there a direction it comes from more than 50% of the time? ...


6

In addition to Charlie's answer on building a shelter: Make sure you don't have to move once the storm hits. You'll likely hardly be able to walk around safely, so make sure you're in the best spot already. Stay well above the waterline to avoid raising rivers/flash floods. Stay away from ravines that could be dangerous because of avalanches/mudslides. ...


6

As you mentioned, a vertical sail gives you more power, so where possible that should be your goal, but the drag caused when heeling is enough that for most catamarans you want to minimise it as much as possible. So aim to keep the windward hull just out of the water in calm seas, and a little higher in rough seas, in order to avoid a rough ride. If the ...


6

As said elsewhere “It depends”—-on the paddler’s fitness and skill, the geography of the lake, and whether the equipment (boat and clothing) make capsizing inconvenient or dangerous. Generally speaking, paddling into the wind and waves requires greater fitness and less skill (you must maintain a pace and minimze rests to make headway, but it is easy to keep ...


5

Sea foam, ocean foam, beach foam, or spume is a type of foam created by the agitation of seawater, particularly when it contains higher concentrations of dissolved organic matter (including proteins, lignins, and lipids) derived from sources such as the offshore breakdown of algal blooms. -- Wikipedia (2016-07-25): Sea foam Human waste can be a ...


4

I had this issue on canoe trips. I would wear my life jacket over my poncho. Worked a treat. One of the things in my backpack is a bungie cord long enough to use as a belt. It has a bunch of uses in camp too, but fastening around a poncho works. One other easy mod for ponchos is to add some snaps or velcro tabs to make sleeves. Another thing I did ...


4

I've seen people wear ponchos with a belt around the midriff, it looks cool. Ultimately it's probably not the best garment in high wind. You could try sewing in elastic draw cords.


4

Pitch the tent flat. If not flat then most people prefer feet down hill. You may prefer feet up. Lay down and decide what you what. Most people sleep head at the opening. Across the grade you roll - not good. I like feet down hill and head at the opening so opening up hill.


3

If you gets gusts and choppy water, that's what we call "sailing". It happens. :) If the gusts get severe, you reef the sails, or drop the sails altogether. Note that this is still within the normal parameters of sailing. Any competent sailor should be able to deal with this, until you get to gusts so severe that a person would have problems standing ...


3

An interesting article from The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Research lists causes of sea foam, most of which have been covered by all your other answers. It does say that the formation of sea foam varies by different coastal regions. While in general, sea foam is considered safe to humans and birds, and even beneficial, there have ...


3

Sea foam is from diatoms breaking up (unless it is from pollution). Normally, it is from diatoms, which are a form of plankton that have a glass-like silica shell (also their broken shells make diatomaceous earth). When their shell breaks, it mixes with the water and makes sea foam!


2

This blog post has two crazy complex tarp pitches, for a 3x3 meter tarp, that are fully enclosed. I have never tried either, but they look promising. The Summit Wedge The Laavu The Low Tetra also seems like it might work


2

One thing you can do is close up the gap under the fly sheet on the upwind side using something you already have. That's easy for me - I go bike camping and my panniers are heavy duty dry bags that do the job very well (though its only needed on uneven ground with my tent) A rucksack can also be used, especially if you put something in it to give it shape (e....


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