28

First off, I want to make clear that this applies to skiing and snowshoeing as a means of long-distance travel. It doesn't directly apply to skiing in specifically for the descents. Skis are better for: Lake traveling: The snow on frozen lakes tends to be firmer and this enables the ski's inherent advantage, glide. Even when pulling a sled, skis will be ...


16

Yaktrax advertises products intended to help with this, which might be less damaging to interior surfaces than crampons. You can find some SE discussion on those kinds of products here. Keeping a low center of gravity can reduce probability of injury by reducing how far you fall. Positioning yourself so that if you do fall, a softer part of your body (...


15

Here at south Russia, we have lots of ice surfaces every winter and need to walk around. So, practical experience: The simplest option to reduce slipping will be to just glue some hard waterproof low-grit (approx 60-120 grit) sanding paper on the bottom of your shoes. This is often used here amongst aging people that are less agile due to their age. If they ...


14

Short roping is dangerous, but it is also a critical part of guiding. This presentation touches on a lot of the reasons for short roping and risks associated with it. Short roping is claimed to provide three advantages. The first is that the short rope increases the confidence of the weaker climber and there by decreases the likelihood of a fall. The second ...


14

Summary from a winter spend in Winnipeg long ago compared to Central European conditions: there are probably good reasons why native North American people went with snowshoes while native Europeans invented skis. terrain Snowshoes have advantages over skis in bushy terrain off trail (where long skis become super cumbersome) or rugged terrain. Canadian ...


13

In general it really depends on the snow condition. Angle: If it's powder snow you need a quite steep angle (25 degrees and more). If it's icy/ hard/ wind slab snow then you can try it on a less steep (20 degrees) slope. Safety: I would search for a slope where you have a safe run off, if you can't manage do arrest yourself. And also that your runoff is ...


11

Only 1 out of 10 survive Avalanches If you are completely buried in an avalanche the odds of survival are slim, unless you wear a transceiver (beacon), and you have partners that escaped the avalanche who have the right gear (beacon receivers, probes, and shovels) as well as the experience from practicing with them to save you. Statistics show that the ...


8

The most important thing to remember is to prevent this situation. You should never find yourself in the position to slip down a slope. In many cases (steepness, snow/ice conditions, ...) there is no way that you will stop once you are slipping, even if you execute the following perfectly. Still we want to be prepared for the worst case as well. And knowing ...


8

This actually happens to be pretty relevant to Physics(so it's kind of odd it was migrated away from the Physics.SE). You were actually on the right track with the penguin idea and increasing your co-efficient of friction. The graphic in this article has been floating around the internet for a while now. It's pretty self-explanatory, but the gist of it is ...


7

There's a lot that you can do in regards to walking style: Avoid walking on the ice if you can. (if it's a poorly cleared sidewalk, and there's snow on grass near it, walk in the snow) If it's a layer of ice over a base of snow, crack the ice by walking heel first (and really put your weight into it), so that you create footprints in the snow rather than ...


7

Rocky Mountain Canadian here, The easiest way to identify good boots for ice is to simply feel the rubber on the soles. The softer and the stickier the rubber on the soles of the boots, the better traction they will provide on ice. Vulcanized natural rubber is the best. The gold standard for winter boots in Western Canada up in the rockies are Sorel Boots. ...


7

Short roping is an advanced technique, but it is a necessary one to progress quickly and safely in the mountains. As with most techniques, knowing when to apply it just as important (or more) as the technique itself. The safety in short-roping comes from three main ingredients: Coaching the climber through easy moves. Preventing a slip from turning into a ...


6

I am pretty certain that I have already answered why this is dangerous here. As for when it would be a valid technique, If the terrain is such that there is a slight risk of falling, but not enough to justify putting in intermediate placements. When balancing the need for speed with the risk of falling such as trying to get down before a storm. This is ...


5

So far, no one has stated the obvious: Don't step on ice! Walk on snow, bare pavement, rough ground, lawns, flowerbeds, or whatever alternatives there might be. When stepping on ice is unavoidable, here are some observations which can make slipping less likely: Ice is most slippery when it is at freezing temperatures (32 °F/ 0 °C). When it is ...


5

If your aim is just to avoid falling, do as WBT suggests and get some ice-grips. These can be put on and removed in seconds and can be carried in a small bag or even a pocket. But if you get UK-type weather, in which ice is often patchy, avoid grips that use what look like steel springs. These are easily broken on hard surfaces like pavement. Better ...


5

I think what you are looking for is these attachments called Wheelblades, Image Source essentially mini skis that lock onto the front wheels of a wheelchair, Wheelblades are designed as an easy-to-use solution that aid traction and give a little extra oomph through snow, ice and slush. ... Like a snowshoe does for the person wearing it, the ...


4

Having learnt this years ago, I can thoroughly recommend that when you're in a suitable spot with a group you practise. The rest of the group can observe your form, keep an eye out for hazards and generally stand around looking unconcerned. A suitable spot is reasonably deep snow that naturally flattens out, free of rocks and trees. This may also give you ...


4

I've been attending school in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA. We get ridiculous amounts of snow (for the US anyway) and ice. Generally, when I slip on the ice, my feet slide out from under me to my front, and I land on my behind. To counter this, I've learned to walk with shorter steps, keeping most of my weight on the balls of my feet as opposed to ...


4

My best solution for this is to wear a pair of flexible running shoes with spikes. The spikes are at the front; walk towards your toes to make sure the spikes dig in. Team them with warm socks for insulation (and remember a half-size larger than your normal shoes for comfort!) You can also get undersoles with spikes for ordinary shoes. Like as not, someone ...


3

Unless the slopes gradually becomes less and less steep and you're sure there are no glaciers hidden under it, then the only way to safely practice that is to build a solid backup anchor on top of the practice slope and tie into it with a significant amount of rope slack. How to build the anchor is dependent on the terrain. There could be ice on top of the ...


3

So I'm thinking, on my back, head up hill, crampons in the air (to prevent them snagging). I brace my ice axe into against my collar bone. I now need to roll onto my front to push the head of the axe into the snow. But how do I do that without catching my crampons (as I roll). Does that make sense? When you're on your back, you don't need to get your ...


3

Wear socks over your shoes (as well as your usual socks inside your shoes, of course). This is a fairly well-established technique (see e.g. here or here), and its effectiveness has been scientifically demonstrated by Parkin et al. (2009). References "Preventing Winter Falls: a randomised controlled trial of a novel intervention"; Parkin L, Williams SM, ...


3

I find that with icy conditions that you need to change a few things about how you're walking. I used to run on icy trails and snowy conditions and found a few things that helped me not take a spill. Be deliberate with your steps AKA pay attention to what you're doing. I tend to walk more with my head slightly focused down to see where my foot placement ...


3

Emergency Method of Walking a Short Distance on Ice Without Slipping: If you find yourself on ice unexpectedly and you don't have far to go, an emergency option is to remove your shoes/boots entirely and walk in your stocking feet. This is obviously not a good idea if you're not going to be indoors within a couple of minutes, but if you're just walking ...


3

Approaching this from a physics standpoint, the primary reason people slip on ice is due to low friction. I personally think this is not the case, but rather, the low friction is the gunpowder to the bullet that is sliding, but the trigger is not the low friction. The real trigger (in my opinion of course) is force. It is impossible to move without force, ...


3

Just a thought: I used to take my mom to the beach in wheelchairs with oversized tires. They made going across the sand much easier. They're made to get wet and are easy to clean. They have a storage pouch in the back, and even have an umbrella for sun protection. I'm not sure how this would work on snow. Here is a link showing you what I'm talking about. ...


3

Thru-hiking/backpacking an established trail for multiple weeks, do-able in winter The longer hiking trails in ME, NH, and VT, apart from the AT, like the Long Trail and the Metacomet-Monadnock Trail and Cohos Trail just have too much extreme weather on exposed peaks to be safe for a solo hiker. The New England Scenic Trail in CT and MA could be a ...


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