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9

Carry your water in wide-mouth bottles rather than using a camelbak. Pack the bottles close to your body, so that your body heat will help to keep them from freezing.


4

For the few day-hikes I did at around the freezing point of water, I still used a Camelbak-like thing (actually from Deuter). There was never a danger of freezing inside my backpack, but I kept it close to my back and more or less tightly wrapped in other gear. But most importantly, after the first hike where I experienced the tube freezing, I made sure to ...


4

As it is the questions you have are unanswerable - Is it on a permanent snow covered mountain, or seasonal? how deep snow? how high mountain (tree-line)? How isolated? Do you know where you are or not? Daylight hour length? What supplies/gear do you have? How bad are the injuries? Do you have a first aid kit (comprehensive or not)? Where in the world are you?...


2

Consider using a thin poly inner sock followed by a vapor barrier liner sock, followed by a thick wool or synthetic wool outer sock. Then put a super-gaiter over your boot. The VBL sock will prevent sweat from degrading the insulating capability of the outer wool sock. The super gaiter will provide water and wind protection, and add another insulating ...


1

Many jackets for cold temperature have inside "drop pockets", large enough to carry a water bottle. (Also convenient to warm-up a gas canister before using it) If you have the extra carrying capacity, a thermos bottle with hot tea is also really nice when it's cold. If you're camping out, hot water in the bottle at night, keep it in the sleeping ...


1

Water stored in your pack shouldn't freeze during the day. At night, keep your water inside your tent (along with any other gear that doesn't work well when cold, like batteries and stove fuel canisters). So the Platypus pouch in your pack is fine for carrying your water supply. The challenge is how to get that water to your mouth while you hike. Here are a ...


1

Outside of identifying the organization / group that maintains the access roads you're interested in and seeing if they have a web presence, I think a good starting place would be to check out some crowd-sourced info. People who are invested in those areas, or who just like helping out tend to leave comments about a place they just visited. I will say I've ...


1

I agree with the comment above. In the winter Alps, avalanches are always likely to converge. It is not enough to know the trail, you need to know the situation on this trail and it is best to take information from rescuers. As a rule, rescuers have information on routes and they monitor it, since in the Alps there are a large number of tourists and lovers ...


1

You ought to bring an emergency blanket with you, they’re tiny and very lightweight and will increase your temperature significantly. You do get wet with them though, and they are an emergency solution. For me it was a lifesaver when I was unprepared in the Simien mountains where it freezes as night and the other gear was absolutely not sufficient.


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