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28

First off, I want to make clear that this applies to skiing and snowshoeing as a means of long-distance travel. It doesn't directly apply to skiing in specifically for the descents. Skis are better for: Lake traveling: The snow on frozen lakes tends to be firmer and this enables the ski's inherent advantage, glide. Even when pulling a sled, skis will be ...


16

The best answer I’ve come up with so far is to combine neoprene paddling gloves such as those sold by NRS with an additional pair of waterproof or semi-waterproof mitten shells designed to be worn over gloves / mittens. This has kept my fingers completely comfortable in air temperatures well below freezing while paddling through rivers or bays where ice is ...


14

Summary from a winter spend in Winnipeg long ago compared to Central European conditions: there are probably good reasons why native North American people went with snowshoes while native Europeans invented skis. terrain Snowshoes have advantages over skis in bushy terrain off trail (where long skis become super cumbersome) or rugged terrain. Canadian ...


14

I haven't been paddling much for several years, but I used to go all winter with simple fleece gloves inside waterproof dishwashing rubber gloves. I tried a half dozen other alternatives, including wetsuit gloves, other waterproof gloves, pogies, etc. Fleece insulation and waterproof outside worked best, and was also very inexpensive.


12

Both are dangerous, and as James says both require drivers to be extra cautious and adjust their driving. However from my experience living in Alberta, Canada where we spend ~5 months of the year in the snow with temperatures as low as -25C ice with snow on top is more dangerous. Ice with snow on top once your vehicle begins to slide your tires are not in ...


10

The key for cold weather clothing is layers ...some tips (some from experience, some from reading/hearing from others): Use layers, especially on your top body Wear something on your head (you lose a lot of warmth through your head) (moved up by comment of bob) Your body (chest/back) is most important to keep warm Use not thick clothes, but more thin ...


8

Sometimes known as paddle mitts, pogies are your friends here, you can choose to wear gloves in them as well or not, depending on how cold it's got, but most importantly they allow you full contact with the paddle and hence you don't get the extra fatigue caused by a reduced level of paddle control. Pogies range from a simple nylon shell that keeps the wind ...


7

Good snow goggles as described in ab2's answer take a while to make. A quick and dirty way for temporary use can be made with bark. Birch bark is probably easiest to work with, but any smooth bark that you can peel off the tree should work. Try alder and aspen, and willow. You may need to make a baton and pound on the tree some to loosen the bark. Don't ...


7

There are multiple types of winter hiking that you may refer to. First there is the winter hiking trails. These are often found in or near ski resorts. They are often groomed and can therefore be used with normal boots, no snow shoes required. There trails are typically leading from one cable car station to another or from town to town. Lower in the valley ...


6

For temperatures down to -40°C you need solid insulated mountaineering boots; buy them together with crampons so they fit well. All modern snowshoes will be compatible. There are many such boots on the market; it should be easy to find those that fit you the best. Some classics are: La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX, Scarpa Mont Blanc Pro GTX. I personally use ...


5

This answer will work only if you have a knife, preferably a multi-tool knife, and are adept at using it. Make a pair of Inuit goggles, as described in Snow Goggles, Wikipedia: The goggles are traditionally made of driftwood (especially spruce), bone, walrus ivory, caribou antler, or in some cases seashore grass. The workpiece is carved to fit the ...


4

My configuration in cold weather is: Head: Wool hat when dry, additionally hood from rain jacket when wet. Upper body: Merino wool base layer (not too thick for me because I tend to be warm), maybe another layer of merino wool if it is very cold, down jacket (mostly worn during breaks, otherwise too warm for me), and a proper water and windproof hard shell ...


3

200 liters of air weighs about 240 grams and heats up about as fast as 240 grams of sleeping bag, or 240 grams of yoga mat, I mean in a short time. It was reported that the air never heated up much though. Well that was because the air was moving around and dumping heat into the ground, as still air is one of the best insulators. If a bony person lays ...


3

As @Paul Lydon said, it is subjective because some people feel the cold more than others. Plus some people who are otherwise relatively unaffected by cold may, because of circulation problems, feel the cold in their hands more than others. The answer to the OP's question also depends on the length of time he will be outside, and the wind, and whether his ...


3

If you need a water supply that will not freeze without additives, dig a hole in the ground. In the hole place a hard sided cooler . The top of the cooler should be no less than 1 foot below ground level. Drape a small tarp or other heavy material that will not degrade. The tarp will rest over the cooler and overlap the sides of the hole. Fill over the top ...


2

Asnes makes backcountry skis without metal edges especially for skiing with dogs. The website shows them in various widths and sidecuts. It looks like they are mainly used for hunting (with dogs). Most of the time I'm fine on skate skis, even breaking moderate trails with the dogs pulling. When I go fast enough, even a skate ski floats! I've done fast BC ...


2

In addition to the other answers: you might take a look at snowblades. These are very short skis, which means that you can both ski and relatively easily cross forests. --Edit Bear in mind that next to advantages of both, they have disadvantages of both as well. It may be wise not to use them if you don't have experience with them.


2

For my few forays into such weather I have worn: Heavy merino wool socks over silk liner socks. Merino wool under my pants. For my upper body I go with layers on the outside rather than anything under my top. I will either wear my puffy vest under a light jacket, or a puffy jacket with a hood. If things get too wet the light jacket gets replaced by my ...


2

The roads are not the danger, the drivers on the road are the danger! Think about your question inversely (antonym); "Which is safer, icy roads or icy roads with snow on top?" It is not the presence or lack of ice/snow that creates the danger/safety, it is how the driver responds to the presence of the snow/ice. For example, drivers with 4x4 trucks ...


2

Wind blocking is important in cold weather. A very small breeze on skin whisks away your warm air. On the flip side, keeping a thin layer of air stationary next to you works very well. I have an old sierra designs 3 layer gore-tex wind parka that over the years has lost its water repellancy. I still use it in winter, over a long sleeve polypro top. Your ...


2

Question was edited to add the criteria of maximum 2 layers of something light. This invalidates the initial answers, but I am leaving this because I still think it is the proper solution to outdoor warmth. The real trick to staying warm is dressing in layers. If you put on enough layers, then you don't even need a jacket. The weather in my area is ...


1

Many good suggestions here; regardless of your choice of boot, MAKE CERTAIN THEY FIT WELL while wearing two pairs of socks. Too tight boots will cut off circulation and be wickedly uncomfortable. Great boots without great socks, won’t keep your feet warm. My go-to socks are injini inner sock with the appropriate weight Darn Tough outer sock. You can find ...


1

I recommend two Canadian brand: Kamik (very low price) and Baffin(low price). Their boots target everyday outdoor worker/farmer/hunter so they know what they are doing. They make solid snow boots. I use them with crampon for ice fishing trips. They feature complete water proof, good insulation, removable pelt liner. This setup is closer to a winter ...


1

The question as you asked it is unanswerable - you supplied cold and (potentially) humid - no mention of wind or duration for outside; 10 min is very different to 1 hour, which is very very different to 1 day! I can't comment specifically on any of those jackets you linked. They are all from reputable companies that produce serious mountaineering gear and ...


1

A related point that I have not noticed come up yet has less to do with the clothes you take (anything not cotton will do you fine) and more to do with what you do with them. No matter what the material, even synthetics that claim to insulate when wet, will make you cold if you are wearing them wet. The synthetic manufacturers are proud to note that their ...


1

Lots of good info and advice on this thread. I will simply add that regardless of ambient temperature, get yourself a pair of DARN TOUGH SOCKS. I LOVE these socks and they come with a warranty that will knock your socks off. If there is ANY issue with the socks, send them back and they will send a brand new pair, no questions asked.


1

To add to MichelKejzers' and Alexander's answers At 3 - 5 °C while hiking I often wear only a long-sleeve shirt or T-Shirt + thin fleece pollover, if the sun is shining or there isn't much wind or a bit later in winter you may even find me in T-Shirt only. A lot here depends on acclimatization: now being fall, I'm not yet as acclimatized to cool weather as ...


1

There are a lot of factors that determine what R value you will need. While the low temperature might be 10°F (-12°C), the ground could be substantially warmer (or potentially colder). The temperature of the surface you are sleeping on is much more important than the air temperature. It also matters how well the surface conducts heat; sleeping in a hammock (...


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