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Hot answers tagged

28

First off, I want to make clear that this applies to skiing and snowshoeing as a means of long-distance travel. It doesn't directly apply to skiing in specifically for the descents. Skis are better for: Lake traveling: The snow on frozen lakes tends to be firmer and this enables the ski's inherent advantage, glide. Even when pulling a sled, skis will be ...


27

I do not have much alpine experience Climbing the Breithorn in the winter is a much different matter than in the spring or summer. Any 4,000 meter peak in the alps is subject to arctic weather conditions with high winds and temperatures far below freezing. There is also going to be very deep snow, so unless you know how to ski or snowshoe, you are going to ...


23

As usual, skills are the lightest and most effective thing one can carry. From how to bushcraft useful things from natural materials, to clever ways to satisfy needs like signaling or navigation, to keeping a healthy state of mind. Nonetheless, some useful items greatly increase chance of success / reduce chance of suffering. The less skills, the more ...


22

Second Edit: Thanks for all the upvotes. I just want to clarify one thing: I don't think I've done a good job in answering the OP's question. I think cr0's answer is much better for winter hiking. This little kit that I've put together is my 3-season emergency kit. Consider it the start of an emergency kit for the winter. [Also, since I have a fair ...


17

I have spent significant time in the backcountry in the winter. Last year I did an early season through hike of the Continental Divide Trail, spending months living in the snow. Below is a list of some items I'd recommend bringing if you're going on a casual hike in the winter. You should not bring all of these at once. Consider the conditions, your ...


16

The best answer I’ve come up with so far is to combine neoprene paddling gloves such as those sold by NRS with an additional pair of waterproof or semi-waterproof mitten shells designed to be worn over gloves / mittens. This has kept my fingers completely comfortable in air temperatures well below freezing while paddling through rivers or bays where ice is ...


14

I haven't been paddling much for several years, but I used to go all winter with simple fleece gloves inside waterproof dishwashing rubber gloves. I tried a half dozen other alternatives, including wetsuit gloves, other waterproof gloves, pogies, etc. Fleece insulation and waterproof outside worked best, and was also very inexpensive.


14

Summary from a winter spend in Winnipeg long ago compared to Central European conditions: there are probably good reasons why native North American people went with snowshoes while native Europeans invented skis. terrain Snowshoes have advantages over skis in bushy terrain off trail (where long skis become super cumbersome) or rugged terrain. Canadian ...


14

As a general rule, I think it unwise to attempt, solo, for the first time, the sort of climb that one has no experience with, especially if it carries the potential for a serious accident. You have winter against you, ice against you, inexperience against you, and possibly an unknown reaction to 4,164 meters against you. Solo? No, not unless your meaning ...


10

First: buddies. Solo activities are inherently riskier. Not that's out of the way, what kit is practical? Extra insulation and extra wind/waterproofing. This may be just one item, but it's more likely to be a foil blanket, extra mid layer, and survival bag. If you stop moving, you stop generating as much heat, so you need insulation. The extra mid layer, ...


10

The key for cold weather clothing is layers ...some tips (some from experience, some from reading/hearing from others): Use layers, especially on your top body Wear something on your head (you lose a lot of warmth through your head) (moved up by comment of bob) Your body (chest/back) is most important to keep warm Use not thick clothes, but more thin ...


8

Sometimes known as paddle mitts, pogies are your friends here, you can choose to wear gloves in them as well or not, depending on how cold it's got, but most importantly they allow you full contact with the paddle and hence you don't get the extra fatigue caused by a reduced level of paddle control. Pogies range from a simple nylon shell that keeps the wind ...


7

Good snow goggles as described in ab2's answer take a while to make. A quick and dirty way for temporary use can be made with bark. Birch bark is probably easiest to work with, but any smooth bark that you can peel off the tree should work. Try alder and aspen, and willow. You may need to make a baton and pound on the tree some to loosen the bark. Don't ...


7

There are some good answers here from some people with solid experience in mountains in the winter. However, these answers seem to slant extremely heavy on gear. Sometimes it's reasonable to do a day hike in winter in the mountains in a lightweight style, but you do want to be carrying the crucial things in your lightweight kit. The first thing to do is to ...


6

The safest concept is to always plan for the worst case. Of course, best practice varies according to context. Whether you're going solo or in a group, the equipment will change. Same goes for the different seasons. But generally, plan for slightly more than what you expect; i.e. if you're going on a day-trip, carry at least enough to overnight outside. In ...


5

From your profile, I think your chipmunk is the Eastern Chipmunk, Tamias striatus. They're the most common chipmunk species in Virginia. That's what I have too, so this answer is based on the behavior of that species. Don't deprive yourself of heat, especially in a blackout! If possible though, leave at least a few inches of dense wood and brush in that ...


5

Given that the OP said Europe, the advice should always include seeking local advice because there are a wide variety of conditions in Europe driven by the effects of the Gulf stream that can be significantly different to the conditions in North America. There are areas that have similar continental weather, but the mild oceanic aspects in winter can really ...


5

This answer will work only if you have a knife, preferably a multi-tool knife, and are adept at using it. Make a pair of Inuit goggles, as described in Snow Goggles, Wikipedia: The goggles are traditionally made of driftwood (especially spruce), bone, walrus ivory, caribou antler, or in some cases seashore grass. The workpiece is carved to fit the ...


4

My configuration in cold weather is: Head: Wool hat when dry, additionally hood from rain jacket when wet. Upper body: Merino wool base layer (not too thick for me because I tend to be warm), maybe another layer of merino wool if it is very cold, down jacket (mostly worn during breaks, otherwise too warm for me), and a proper water and windproof hard shell ...


3

200 liters of air weighs about 240 grams and heats up about as fast as 240 grams of sleeping bag, or 240 grams of yoga mat, I mean in a short time. It was reported that the air never heated up much though. Well that was because the air was moving around and dumping heat into the ground, as still air is one of the best insulators. If a bony person lays ...


3

This query started with a local accident. Yeah. We get so many of these. I was moved by the James Kim story. For the want of a nail... Have a 406MHz ELT Every big player from the Royal Navy to Emirates wants a world-class global locator beacon system that works anywhere. However, the infrastructure cost of a worldwide system is simply too high to ...


3

As @Paul Lydon said, it is subjective because some people feel the cold more than others. Plus some people who are otherwise relatively unaffected by cold may, because of circulation problems, feel the cold in their hands more than others. The answer to the OP's question also depends on the length of time he will be outside, and the wind, and whether his ...


2

In addition to the other answers: you might take a look at snowblades. These are very short skis, which means that you can both ski and relatively easily cross forests. --Edit Bear in mind that next to advantages of both, they have disadvantages of both as well. It may be wise not to use them if you don't have experience with them.


2

Asnes makes backcountry skis without metal edges especially for skiing with dogs. The website shows them in various widths and sidecuts. It looks like they are mainly used for hunting (with dogs). Most of the time I'm fine on skate skis, even breaking moderate trails with the dogs pulling. When I go fast enough, even a skate ski floats! I've done fast BC ...


2

When a canoe has one end on shore,it's unstable. It helps if one person squats with knees on either side of the bow while the first person steps in. At the end, the bowsman steps into the canoe and pushes off at the same time. Approaching shore, try for a spot with few rocks, and hit the shore moving at about 1/2 speed. Bowsman steps out onto the shore. ...


2

To start with, there is no such "list" which can adequately cover your question- every trip is different, every scenario is variable, and winter is such a broad period that regions have completely different challenges ("winter" in the Northern Hemisphere happens in a different part of the calendar year than it does in the Southern Hemisphere, and January in ...


2

If animals like chipmunks or packrats nest in woodpiles, it's much more typical for them to be down low, closer to the ground. It would also depend on how it is stacked, if its bigger logs with bigger holes between the logs, then they are less likely to be there. Just taking off the top should be fine.


2

I'd add a space blanket to each person - one of those thin mylar foil things worth a couple dollars. They're not heavy, and while they're not perfect its better than being caught in the cold with nothing warm. They're not a coat but they are waterproof, so will stop you getting more wet in the rain. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_blanket Why one per ...


2

Question was edited to add the criteria of maximum 2 layers of something light. This invalidates the initial answers, but I am leaving this because I still think it is the proper solution to outdoor warmth. The real trick to staying warm is dressing in layers. If you put on enough layers, then you don't even need a jacket. The weather in my area is ...


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