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Except for the type of shoes, I wouldn't use shoes with a thin sole, because when the road is covered with snow it's very easy to miss some dirt or other small objects where you place your shoes on. I even would say, it is better to run slightly more on your mid-foot and not heel, to prevent twisting your ankle.


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There are multiple types of winter hiking that you may refer to. First there is the winter hiking trails. These are often found in or near ski resorts. They are often groomed and can therefore be used with normal boots, no snow shoes required. There trails are typically leading from one cable car station to another or from town to town. Lower in the valley ...


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Many good suggestions here; regardless of your choice of boot, MAKE CERTAIN THEY FIT WELL while wearing two pairs of socks. Too tight boots will cut off circulation and be wickedly uncomfortable. Great boots without great socks, won’t keep your feet warm. My go-to socks are injini inner sock with the appropriate weight Darn Tough outer sock. You can find ...


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For temperatures down to -40°C you need solid insulated mountaineering boots; buy them together with crampons so they fit well. All modern snowshoes will be compatible. There are many such boots on the market; it should be easy to find those that fit you the best. Some classics are: La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX, Scarpa Mont Blanc Pro GTX. I personally use ...


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I recommend two Canadian brand: Kamik (very low price) and Baffin(low price). Their boots target everyday outdoor worker/farmer/hunter so they know what they are doing. They make solid snow boots. I use them with crampon for ice fishing trips. They feature complete water proof, good insulation, removable pelt liner. This setup is closer to a winter ...


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Getting rid of the subjectivity of danger, I am going to answer this for two different basic scenarios. There are so many variables that are possible within scope of the question, but I am going to leave it to 2 scenarios. Plain ice, and snow over plain ice and the. apply studded winter tires or plain all season or 3 season tires to those. Under normal ...


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Both are dangerous, and as James says both require drivers to be extra cautious and adjust their driving. However from my experience living in Alberta, Canada where we spend ~5 months of the year in the snow with temperatures as low as -25C ice with snow on top is more dangerous. Ice with snow on top once your vehicle begins to slide your tires are not in ...


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The roads are not the danger, the drivers on the road are the danger! Think about your question inversely (antonym); "Which is safer, icy roads or icy roads with snow on top?" It is not the presence or lack of ice/snow that creates the danger/safety, it is how the driver responds to the presence of the snow/ice. For example, drivers with 4x4 trucks ...


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If you need a water supply that will not freeze without additives, dig a hole in the ground. In the hole place a hard sided cooler . The top of the cooler should be no less than 1 foot below ground level. Drape a small tarp or other heavy material that will not degrade. The tarp will rest over the cooler and overlap the sides of the hole. Fill over the top ...


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Battery Powered, Heated Jacket With the newly added criteria of "not more than 2 layers of something light" I began to fear there is no answer. However, your mention of strolling specifically in cities may have saved you. I think the only thing that might fit all your criteria, or at least come the closest to it, is a heated jacket. There are jackets which ...


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Wind blocking is important in cold weather. A very small breeze on skin whisks away your warm air. On the flip side, keeping a thin layer of air stationary next to you works very well. I have an old sierra designs 3 layer gore-tex wind parka that over the years has lost its water repellancy. I still use it in winter, over a long sleeve polypro top. Your ...


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Question was edited to add the criteria of maximum 2 layers of something light. This invalidates the initial answers, but I am leaving this because I still think it is the proper solution to outdoor warmth. The real trick to staying warm is dressing in layers. If you put on enough layers, then you don't even need a jacket. The weather in my area is ...


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The question as you asked it is unanswerable - you supplied cold and (potentially) humid - no mention of wind or duration for outside; 10 min is very different to 1 hour, which is very very different to 1 day! I can't comment specifically on any of those jackets you linked. They are all from reputable companies that produce serious mountaineering gear and ...


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