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11

According to this article, (How to Tell a Raven From a Crow): Ravens often travel in pairs, while crows are seen in larger groups. Also, watch the bird’s tail as it flies overhead. The crow’s tail feathers are basically the same length, so when the bird spreads its tail, it opens like a fan. Ravens, however, have longer middle feathers in their tails, so ...


9

You might try an umbrella. See this article from The Guardian, Rogue owl caught after year-long reign of terror in Dutch town. A rogue owl that has terrorised a northern Dutch city for the past year, forcing citizens to arm themselves with umbrellas at night, has been caught, officials have announced. Dubbed the “terror owl” by residents of ...


9

I suspect this mostly is a result of need, and antipathy. First of all I think your premise that humans can't identify individual animals within a breed or species is false. People who spend significant time with animals like pet owners, farmers, and naturalists can differentiate between "their" animals and new animals much easier than people who aren't ...


8

I support the accepted answer but wanted to add an potentially helpful anecdote. When I joined the Marine Corps as a young man some 20 years ago - the first thing they did was give us a uniform and shave our heads. For the first several weeks after that, I struggled to identify one individual from another - as hair is a key element that we as humans use in ...


7

You're correct that these Torresian Crows can, at times, exhibit aggressive behavior, and, unlike some other crows, may directly attack people. It stems from a defensive parental instinct though, and is territorial in nature. According to The Brisbane City Council's page on Swooping Animals, they, and some of Brisbane's other native birds, are most likely to ...


5

Another two reasons The first is that humans vary much more than crows do - in behavior and in color (clothing) so they are easier to tell apart. The second is that crows (and birds generally) have much more to gain from distinguishing between different humans than humans have from distinguishing crows. Humans are both a source of resources/benefits for ...


5

The biggest difference between ravens and crows is that ravens average 2 feet long with a 4 ft wingspan, while crows are about 1.5 ft long with a wingspan of 3 feet. These numbers can vary a bit regionally and by individual, but for a casual birder, the size difference along is enough to differentiate them. The ravens also have a distinctly deeper call, ...


4

The source for this answer is an article Found a Baby Crow ? on the website of an organization called Pacific Wildlife. I'm not a bird expert by any means, and certainly not a crow expert. Everything I say is from this article; the only experience I have with crows is observing them in our neighborhood for years. So I can say from my observations that ...


4

If you release him now he probably dies very soon either due to starvation or due to cats killing him. If you have the time you could nurture him back to health. In the animal world it often happens that parents only care for their offspring as long as it can't provide for itself. So if you nurture him back to health and release him when he is ready this ...


3

Good answers/anecdotes thus far. I find this interesting and asked an avian specialist about this. In addition to most of what has already been said (that crows have more time, necessity, and better vantage points to observe us), they emphasized a point Erik briefly touched on - their sneakiness: Crows are not easy to differentiate, even if we do watch ...


3

This is not a complete answer, but there is evidence that crow populations are rebounding. From The Virginian-Pilot, July, 2017. Crows? Who’s been seeing and hearing a lot of these noisy raucous critters this year? I certainly have. The big black birds are raising Cain, up and down the North End. This paper is based in Norfolk, about a four ...


2

I am a little late in answering, but thought I would answer in the event you were still feeding your local Corvids. As Olin said, they are intelligent and amazingly so. That is important when trying to woo them to a feeding area because they will stay away if something has made them feel at risk (pets, wind chimes, clanging objects like ladders or loose ...


2

Birds of the genus Corvus are intelligent and generalists. They are not picky, and can survive on lots of different types of food. They are also more able than other birds to find clever ways to get to food. Anything edible that isn't small seed they can't pick up easily will interest them. I've had ravens catch little bits of cheese I threw up in the ...


2

Ravens spend a lot of time aloft, and fly steadily and sometimes quite high (also solo or in loose pairs most of the time). They call infrequently "cronk" or "cronk cronk" while airborne. They seem to need a good reason to take off but also to land. When they're perched (which they like to do from a good vantage point), a good look can show shaggy feathers ...


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