13

That is a sweet gum tree. The distinctive compound fruit is hard, dry, and globose,1–1.5 inches (25–38 mm) in diameter, composed of numerous (40-60) capsules.[13] Each capsule, containing one to two small seeds, has a pair of terminal spikes (for a total of 80-120 spikes). When the fruit opens and the seeds are released, each capsule is associated with a ...


9

You may like the look, but those trees are in the process of being killed by a nasty invasive, Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus). It is one of the more common invasives in MA. There have been many things writting about this invasive. It's been on any list of invasive plants in MA that I've seen. Do a search and you'll see. DCR (MA Department ...


8

That's a magnolia tree. I first saw one in Delaware in the dead of winter encased in ice after an ice storm. All the other trees had dropped their leaves, but the magnolia doesn't shed its thick leaves seasonally, it sheds them like an evergreen throughout the year. It was odd to see a green-leafed tree in the dead of winter. Trees up north shed their ...


7

What you have there is almost certainly a variety of Chameacyparis lawsoniana. These trees are characterized by the flattened scale-like leaves in a fairly dense branching cluster. Wate's golden pine is a Pinus species, all of which have needles for leaves, like you might see on a classic christmas tree. As to which variety it is - there are lots of them, ...


7

After waiting months for the leaves to return on the tree and reading the comment made by Jamesqf, this is a Honey Locust Tree. On the Wikipedia page for the tree, there is a picture that matches what the pods look like before they ripen: One thing I should point out from Jamesqf's comment is that this is a mostly thornless version of the tree. I did ...


5

I would say it is a walnut tree. The bole is flat, and at first sight it seems that someone cut the lower branches of it (at some point when the tree was younger). The leaves also look like the ones of walnut. If it has no fruits on the branches then it might be a bad year, or some hail destroyed the harvest, or the tree might have some illness (see points ...


4

With pictures posted, it looks like it is the African tulip tree (Spathodea campanulata). The decisive features were the long pod with the pores. Similar (but not as strongly heart-shaped) seeds are seen in the jacaranda tree, which has a wider and rounder pod, which usually opens with an outer membrane attached to the edges.


3

Former botanist here. It is not uncommon for this sort of behaviour to happen in the botanical world. There are many forms of this sort of thing, the most commonly seen one is coppicing. Coppicing is often done by people, but it also occurs naturally. In the natural case, an old tree (or a young one) falls over and each branch starts to grow upwards, putting ...


2

Hard to identify from the pictures, but I am pretty sure it is a birch tree. The white spots on the bark and the structure of the leafs are a good indicators. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birch


2

100% magnolia, I have 3 of them in my yard. Beautiful trees, have very fragrant blossoms in the spring and summer.


1

I am going to say that the tree belongs to the Catalpa family. Here is a picture of the green bean pods. In the autumn they bear 20–50 centimetres (7.9–19.7 in) long fruits that resemble a slender bean pod full of small flat seeds, each with two thin wings to aid in wind dispersal. These trees have few limb droppage, but drop large dark-brown bean ...


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