40

As you are aware waterproof breathable fabrics can "wet out" reducing them to simply waterproof fabrics. That does not make wetted out waterproof breathable the same as waterproof non-breathable fabric. Non-breathable fabrics tend to be cheaper, stronger, lighter, and in some cases more water resistant (i.e., a higher mm H2O rating) than corresponding ...


21

You seem to have a specific outdoor activity in mind, like trekking or climbing. But what about water sports? A sailing ship deck would be the most obvious place. Sometimes you won't move much, but you wish to stay 100% dry. In my experience waterproof breathable fabrics are only water resistant. Also notice that fabrics like GoreTex deteriorate with time ...


15

I can totally see your point of view as your coming from forestry or generally working outdoors, but this is fairly straight forward from a hiking point of view: Hiking is walking, meaning work for your legs. I never had cold legs while walking, but the fairly idle arms get cold much faster. Furthermore, open armpits are an easy entry for rain to your core, ...


14

Other things to consider than just what to bring are what the rest of the weather will be beyond just raining. Will it be cold or still quite warm, what is the wind doing (especially if you're going up any big hills), etc. Depending on how severe the rain is, flash flooding may be a risk, especially when it has been very dry before. Similarly if some paths ...


13

There are several uses, but regular strenuous outdoor leisure activities aren't really among them. Breathable gear only goes so far - there comes a point when the best gear you can afford will result in getting very sweaty. This point is a function of temperature, humidity, price and activity level. If you're consistently going to pass that point, non ...


13

The non-breathable pants are usually considerably cheaper than the breathable ones. That can make them a better choice for activities that stand a good chance of ripping holes in the material, glissading down icy slopes for example. Far better to rip your $25 non-breathable pants than your $125 Gore-tex pants.


12

I don’t think that will work for heavy rain. The waterproofing coating will make the water slide away from the garment (this is the so-called lotus effect), but that’s just one part of keeping the water out. The harder part is not letting the water through under pressure, like when you press the garment against something, under your backpack straps, under ...


11

Unfortunately there isn't much you can do if your rain jacket is not breathable. My recommendation is to replace your rain jacket with a poncho, which may be very cheap - while a highly breathable rain jacket cost hundreds of dollars. A poncho is much more ventilated than any jacket and will allow the moisture to leave your body by leaving it way drier; ...


10

The creases that develop can theoretically compromise rain proofing treatment, especially if those creases cycle (bend and straighten repeatedly) however you can always retreat your gear to get more life out of them. Everything in camping is a compromise between what you can carry and what you need. If you need the stuff you've chosen, and in order to bring ...


9

A rain jacket is a good windbreaker as well. The main downside, as you pointed out, is that it will not breathe as well as other fabrics. This shouldn't be an issue as long as you aren't doing a lot of high-output activities (ex: climbing, hiking uphill with a heavy pack for hours). Regular hiking and the likes should be fine.


9

I would imagine it's a breath-ability issue. "Breathable" waterproof fabrics, in my experience, are basically "pretty waterproof and allow some/most moisture out in most conditions." Especially in high humidity or in absolutely soaking weather, the math isn't right for the membrane to allow moisture out. But even in dry conditions if you put a GoreTex ...


9

I've never had too much trouble with a double cuff - a velcro or (better) elastic inner cuff and a loose outer. In the worst conditions, an elasticated inner cuff under a goretex glove with long elasticated wrist seals was good for anything short of immersion. In the worst case a watersports dry cag would solve this. They have latex or neoprene wrist seals....


9

Intro: You can get wet from sweat or wet from rain, or a combination. The waterproof breathables depend on the outside surface being not wet. So the outside layer has to shed water. This generally works well in light to moderate rains -- up to about 1 mm/hour, but fails in major downpours. You will get wet where pack straps bear down on your shoulders, ...


9

I say you should always wear the gear that you already own and you are comfortable in instead of following some fashion trend. If you like your setup go for it. Beyond that I think there are some reasons why people tend to recommend a coat over a vest. First and foremost when you are earning a living outdoors you work more or less in all kinds of weather. ...


7

The non-breathable cheaper wet-weather protection is useful for when you must sometimes go outdoors in heavy rain to do essential jobs, but not for very long. Long enough that you would otherwise get soaked, but not long enough for the lack of ventilation to be a problem.


6

Even breathable fabrics like Gore Tex will make you sweat when it's too warm - there needs to be a certain temperature difference for the fabric to work. So, you'll need to increase ventilation. The aforementioned pit zips are a good idea. A waterproof hat/cap instead of the jacket's hood also helps. Or just use an umbrella ...


6

Polypropylene based rain gear is a subject of great debate. It seems to fit some people's needs perfectly while it is terrible for others. Frogg Toggs is one company, I know DriDucks is another. They both seem to get similar reviews, hot or cold. The material leads to very lightweight rain gear compared to equally breathable/water resistant materials. So it ...


6

If you're going for sealing, just stitch some silnylon over it with a sewing machine and seam seal it. I would recommend sewing two rows as they did, one in the middle of their two, and one an equal distance to the outside of the two existing. The first of the two should provide strong support due to the layering. Make sure you use some fabric on the back ...


6

I wouldn't say what you are experiencing is normal - my Helsport tent has been in use for at least 20 years (for weeks and weeks) and it is still working perfectly. Although, depending on the original quality of the tent I have to say that it is sadly possible. Test again Regretfully the tests you did in the shower aren't telling us to much. While they are ...


6

Non-breathable waterproof garments are basically polyurethane plastic at the surface. This has one very big benefit in that dirt doesn't stick to it much, and what sticks will usually come off with just water. So they're good for uses such as: Trekking in muddy conditions. Just hang them overnight to dry and yesterday's muck falls off. Children's use. A ...


5

While working outside in the rain and when wearing a rain jacket, I have two simple solutions for keeping as dry as possible when the weather is miserable. I do not wear wrist bands because I like to have some ventilation. You cannot stop water from creeping inside, so I use latex gloves inside my regular gloves, this way my hands are reasonably dry. The ...


5

Non-cheep correct-size raincoat. Mine is a decent quality (maybe 40 euro), but is too small for me and my trousers get soaked. Also, it should cover the backpack, as backpack-only rain-protection doesn't work in heavy rain - water finds it's way. Gaiters and boots, obviously. One more pair of socks than you think you will need. There are cheep wool socks for ...


5

There are several size small 32-inch inseam rain pants listed on REI.com so that should at least get you close. If you prefer a 34-inch inseam the closest I have yet found is this REI pant in medium. You found the expensive Arc'Teryx Beta AR in the right size at Mountain Gear.


5

My one experience can be summarised as "ish". It definitely helped / worked in light rain, so if that's all you're trying to achieve then it should be fine. But for heavy rain or pressing the garment against a wet surface, it was all but useless. Afraid it was a while back and I can't remember the specific brand I used, but after talking to a couple of ...


4

From the Nikwax link you provide: For best results remove all non-washable parts and always clean item(s) first with Nikwax Tech Wash®. No need to dry item(s) before waterproofing. Protect working surface and lay clean wet fastened garment flat. Hold bottle 15 cm/6 inches away from garment. Apply evenly to outside of fabric. Wait for ...


4

The answer will depend on the quality of the jacket and therefore somehow also the price. In the high-end range you often find jackets without zipper covers and still they are 100% waterproof (well to be honest this is a lie because at some point water will get through the zippers, still there are standardised tests so they can be called waterproof and not ...


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