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0

Can't speak to deer. I've kept fish on canoe trips from noon one day to breakfast the next morning without a problem. I've also steamed fish, and carried the cooked fish for 36 hours without a problem. These were on trips with temperures in the mid teens (C) overnight to low 20's during the day.


0

The chance of you getting hit depends on a lot of factors; without knowing where the guns are, which direction they are firing, which way the pheasants are being driven from, how far they are from the footpath they are, what angle they are shooting at, etc it is impossible to say how likely you are to get hit. That being said, when beating or shooting birds/...


2

Just to add to previous answers. Mythbusters worked on this problem. They fired 9mm bullets in the air (which would be anywhere from 90-125 grains) and found that it would hurt but not injure you, and certainly not kill you, if it fell on you. Now heavier bullets such .45 caliber pistol rounds (230 grains) and rifle rounds may kill you. It's the mass and ...


18

Falling birdshot stings a little, but I've never known it break the skin. It's no worse than having a 5p piece dropped on you from a couple of feet up. If you're on a public footpath, guns may not legally be discharged within (IIRC) 50 yards, so shot shouldn't reach you - and the shoot organisers would be in serious trouble if they failed to prevent harm ...


3

I performed a calculation using the Chairgun app, which includes ballistic data for a .177 round lead ball. Birdshot is even smaller than this, so it would lose energy even faster than the calculation suggests. If fired from a shotgun at 1,200 feet per second, a .177 lead ball would have a muzzle energy of 25.58 foot pounds. At 90 yards, it would be ...


5

@WeatherVane is spot on, there is a specified safe distance for all kinds of projectiles, depending on what is being shot they simply cannot fly farther no matter how it was aimed. If they are shooting at their own people out in the field, standard safety procedures would imply that they are beyond the range of any projectiles and you would be too. ...


27

Pheasant shooters will almost certainly be using shotguns, not rifles. A shotgun cartridge contains many small pellets, and they lose their velocity much more rapidly than bullets do. In fact, their range is comparatively short. The typical shot size used for pheasant shooting is #4 to #6, as revealed in A Guide to Pheasant Hunting Ammo and Chokes, for a ...


7

The likelihood of you getting hit is difficult to estimate, but it's very, very improbable that you'd be struck randomly by falling shot. It'd be hard to make that arcing shot of hundreds of yards even if the hunters were trying to hit you, so the odds of a random shot hitting you are even lower. There are likely more birds than hunters in your area, so I'd ...


7

In addition to @JamesJenkins' answer: Blood and innards of a deer are removed asap*, and AFAIK the same was done in pre-fridge days: they'd probably cook + eat the organs (possibly incl. the blood) and possibly wash the gut so it can later be used to make sausages. If they have hunting dogs with them, they'd get something as well (lung, bronchi). The ...


2

There is not a single "right" answer to this question. The body can last for much longer then you are willing to eat from it. As a rule of thumb, maggots can start to appear within about 24 hours of the first fly landing on the body. If this causes you to stop eating, is a matter of how hungry you are. Optimally you will start preserving (smoking) the ...


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