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13

There are two principal techniques for making stone tools, depending on the properties of the material you have available. The first and probably best known is knapping. This is used with glassy rocks like flint and obsidian which can form sharp fracture surfaces when struck or pressed. This process takes a fair degree of skill as you need to understand ...


8

Iron ore is called hematite. It's pretty simple to identify, just look for red rocks that appear to be rusting. Iron is the 4th most abundant element on earth, so it's pretty common in most areas. The most primitive way to smelt ore is to construct a furnace out of mud, create a fiery inferno inside of it and then pour in all of your ore. You can ...


8

I read the question more as "Does what I want exist here?" rather than "Is the stuff here going to be good enough quality?" So my answer was initially in that light. OP shows in comment that what was really wanted was the latter, "Is the stuff here going to be good enough quality?" Scroll down below the horizontal line for the original answer, which I left ...


7

The simplest way of smelting iron is a bloomery furnace. This is essentially a beehive shaped structure, covered in clay and containing alternating layers of charcoal and iron ore with openings top and bottom to allow a controlled airflow through the stack. Iron ore comes in several forms but is essentially various iron oxides mixed with silicates. The ...


6

You have to chip it. Primitive hand axes were very slowly and carefully shaped using another stone to chip away at the tool bit by bit until the desired shape was achieved. They were then sharpened against another stone in a similar fashion to using a modern wet-stone today. The process for shaping obsidian is known as flint-knapping. One method of flint-...


5

Here's an article about the Iroquois long house: https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/longhouse Woodland Cree made log cabins, generally with shed roofs covered in layers of poles, dirt, and bark. Cherokee also were cabin builders. Inuit made skin tents over pits for summer use. The teepee was only used on the plains AFAIK. The building in ...


5

No Well, it's probably not impossible depending on how wet, but I can pretty much guarantee you're going to spend more time striking your steel trying to get the wetter stuff lit than if you were to take the time to find or prepare dry tinder. You're wrong to assume that everything is wet. Everything may be wet on the outside, but most logs will be nice ...


5

tl;dr Gather a few plants from your area. For each one, flip a coin; if it's tails, you can use it for what you describe. Where I'm coming from on this I live near the area you specify; in New York, not in the Adirondacks but to the west of them, and I have been there. Fortunately though, my advice is generic. I have just recently gotten deeper into the ...


5

Spruce roots Spruce roots have been used as cordage since prehistorical times, they were also used by native inhabitants of North America (see here). Very short explanation: basically you dig up spruce roots, then shave off its bark and the small side-roots by pulling the length of the root through a split stick. You then split the root down its length, ...


4

As an alternative to making an actual axe head you could create a simple chisel, which you then hit with a piece of wood that serves as a hammer. This can be used fairly efficiently to slowly cut through even larger trees and has the several benefits versus a proper axe: A chisel is far quicker to make and thus more easily replaced. You save yourself the ...


3

The article Iron Production in the Viking Age on Hurstwic discusses sources of iron available in the wilderness of Scandinavia and Iceland. To my knowledge and experience, similar sources exist in what is now eastern Canada. From that article and other reading I identify two primary sources of iron people gathered from the wild for primitive tool making: ...


2

It depends : A ferrocerium rod will produce more, hotter, larger sparks than a traditional flint and steel and with care you can shave off a small pile of material from the rod without sparking it which can act as an igniter. Ideally you should carry a reasonable quantity of tinder with you in a waterproof container like a tobacco tin, this means that ...


2

The standard emergency tinder in most places I have been is a lichen called Old Man's Beard. It can appear in several forms. Here are the first two from Wikipedia: Even if it is soaking wet, heavily raining, caked in ice, or encased in snow, one need only remove most of the excess moisture by vigorously shaking (or bending to break out the ice). It is ...


2

In truth Iron extracted from sand with a magnet. You loose 1/2 when you melt it down. But is near pure. Slow but sure. For small scale separation of sand from iron filings, See this article: How do you separate sand, salt and iron filings?. For larger scale separation of iron from black beach sand, see PULLING IRON from GOLD BEACH or How to Extract ...


2

Black locust is in some areas of the northeast now, but I don't know about the Adirondacks. It is listed as very durable for rot resistance, and is mentioned as being used for fence posts because of this. Other durable species can be found from this link. There are 31 listed as very durable (greater than 25 years of service life in ground contact, but only ...


1

Take a closer look at european construction techniques up to the invention of asphalt and steel roofing. In general, if you can keep the water off of the building, you can use a water soluble medium. Technologies used: Thatched roofs with large eaves. Thatch has to be quite thick, and quite steep to be effective. Material is usually heavy reeds. ...


1

A somewhat more general answer, not focused on the Adirondacks. Most areas have an agriculture or forestry division, or natural resources division that has done extensive soil maps of the state. Try searching for "soil maps" name of state or county Include the quotes. You can also look for woodlot associations, forestry associations. If this fails ...


1

A mix of spruce resin, lard, and wood ashes was used by both voyageurs and natives for caulking the seams of birch bark canoes. Spruce logs have smaller branches than pine, and so are easier to make into even surfaces for making cabins. But give the amount of work to move logs, generally you used what was handy. It's harder to split than cedar, but you ...


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