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20

I only see an advantage if your boots are wet: Then I would advise to remove the wet shoes and socks. Maybe you are in the lucky position to have some dry spare socks in your backpack. If not you may have a bivi sack to heat up your extremities. Otherwise you can at least put your feet in your backpack. This would help immensely. If the boots are dry, I ...


16

Yes, there are special places where you are allowed to sleep outside if you are climbing there. And by "outside" I mean without a tent, because these locations are (more or less) weatherproof by having roofs of rock. They usually have a a lot of sand on the ground which makes them quite comfortable. The local term of such a place is "boofe". They are a bit ...


16

Yes it is, but only for one night in any single spot. Staying multiple nights is considered camping and is not allowed. It is never allowed in national parks. I could only find Dutch references for this, but they all say the same and refer to relevant text in the Austrian lawbooks.


13

tl;dr What you describe is absolutely allowed (using a bivouac to spend one night). If you set up a small camp (described as a "planned bivouac" further in this text), you shouldn't be in a protected area. Bivouac Wikipedia Sleeping one night without a tent or a small igloo. An emergency bivouac is basically allowed everywhere. A planned bivouac is ...


11

As an anecdote, I did. I unexpectedly bivied overnight during a snowstorm at 14kft in -15F, 50mph winds with a pack, bivy sack and warm clothes. I had dry feet prior, didn't have an issue getting the boots back on, and walked out in the morning without frostbite. I used my pack and boots to stabilize the loose snow ledge and provide insulation. I alternated ...


9

According to German law, bivouacking (defined as sleeping outside for one night without a tent) is generally allowed in Germany, but only outside from nature protection areas. Camping is generally forbidden outside of designated campsites. As you mention, large parts of the Elbe Sandstone Mountains are under statutory protection within Saxon Switzerland ...


9

TLDR: -148 °F including windchill has been survived inside of a snowcave. I went looking for cases of people surviving extremely low temperatures while inside a snow caves, and it looks like the record is held by the climbers who did the first winter ascent on Denali. On February 28, 1967, Dave Johnston, Art Davidson, and Ray Genet became the first ...


9

First of all, I will just spread some ideas. I never did a winter bivi by myself. Please don't blindly trust my words. But... because I am interested in the idea and like to do something similar in future, I searched for some info which might help you (and me). Still I am looking forward for better answers (which are based on experience and real knowledge!)....


7

If you sleep only in a bivy bag direct on snow you need to have a sleeping bag with a good isolated pad for the temperature in the forecast at least. If you sleep in a well build igloo the temperature is much warmer than the outside. Snow is used because the air pockets trapped in it make it an insulator. On the outside, temperatures may be as low as −45 ...


7

If you put a plastic back over your head, you are going to suffocate. A good bivvy bag should be designed such that suffocation is not an issue. However, breathing into a bivvy bag is a terrible idea because the vapour in your breath will condense and make you wet. Make this question a non issue by not breathing into your bivvy bag. Leave an opening. Check ...


7

Bivying used to be regarded as a desperate act that you'd do in an emergency. In these circumstances a large polythene bag would serve as a make do shelter. Very cheap simple and pretty awful. In more recent years bivying has become more widespread in the outdoor adventure arena and purpose built kit is now available. A comfortable bivy is a fine art that ...


6

If you are going to alpine area, your most important concern has to be security. Even with best equipment, knowledge about the dangers and how to avoid them is far more important. As you specifically asked for equipment, I will address these points. The only way I know of to spend a cold winter night comfortable is in some sort of a snow cave. There are ...


6

My recommendation would be to coil it into a carpet, it's be the easiest and most comfortable, but it wouldn't stay together very well. You could put your tarp over top if you have a rope tarp, that would help keep it nicely coiled a bit, but tossing and turning at night would eventually end you up in the same position as just messily flaking your rope out. ...


5

In terms of the average hike that you talk about, with not reaching your intended campsite, there's really no difference in bivouacking and just camping without a tent. So you'd basically look for similar conditions that you'd normally camp in. Find a place out of the wind, preferably with a cover like trees. Make sure you're on high ground and not in ...


5

Using a sleeping bag liner can usually add 5-8°c or more warmth capability to your sleeping bag. However, do not use a cotton liner if you are in cold climates, as that can hold onto moisture from your body and cause you trouble.


4

Probing is the best and only guaranteed technique for safely locating crevasses. Knowing how crevasses form will help you identify areas where crevasses are more likely to be, but you can't be certain a crevasse is directly below you if it is not already obvious from above ground.


4

I've used a cotton bag liner for winter camping for the past couple years, I love it. I'm usually a huge opponent to wearing cotton in winter, but that's because most people are pretty careless about moisture control these days. If you read my answer to, "Does Cotton Really Kill?", I point out that cotton was worn on the very first summit of Everest. The ...


4

I usually use trekking poles when walking and have been for over 20 years as it helps prevent knee injury so I would use them with a tarp. Since you want to use a dedicated pole for a tarp which is lightweight, you could have a look at this one http://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/shelter-accessories/WA114.html from a UK website dedicated to lightweight gear. ...


3

Many ultra light tents which use trekking poles as part of the framing offer the alternative of using carbon fiber poles (1-2oz), carbon fiber and fiberglass (1.8oz), or aluminium (4oz). I used one carbon fiber pole over a long period of time for the awning of my LightHeart Solo tent (they only sell aluminium now). In one of my first outings, the carbon ...


2

Space blankets are good insulators. They prevent your body heat from escaping due to radiation and convection. They however do not prevent conduction based heat loss. Given this, the best place to use a space blanket would be around your body. This would mean that the heat radiated from your body is reflected back and the warmth is retained. In most of the ...


2

In my experience the two most important things you can do to improve the range of a bag are: Improve your ground insulation. Warm your extremities. Ground insulation is far more important than most people appreciate. If budget is no object you can invest in the NeoAir Xtherm, which is a breakthrough product. On a tight budget you can buy closed cell foam ...


1

Yes, it is forbidden make a fire, build a tent or sleep outsite also in the national park Bohemian Switzerland. Offical website: www.npcs.cz


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