New answers tagged

1

In addition to other answers, I think one thing has been sorely missed. Alpine environments are fragile. So even if somehow you were able to ethically fuel a fire high up, it would be very hard to prevent burning the ground and very hard to properly dispose of the ash. Some areas are sensitive to certain fertilizers because the native soil doesn't have a lot ...


2

Another reason for not leaving a fire unattended or burning for longer than needed are the smaller roots of trees that are closer to the ground surface and can reach quite far (even 10 feet). If you build a fire that is dug into the ground then you might cut through some of these roots. Lighting a fire can set these small roots on fire, and in case of dry ...


13

But... wouldn't it be better to burn a fire at high elevations, presuming you've brought in your own wood or fuel? Trees become very sparse at these elevations and temperatures are relatively low. The sparseness of trees is exactly the reason not to allow fires. In your example, Okanogan-Wenatchee NF is pretty far north (east of Seattle), so the tree line ...


5

Question: if you were a park ranger, how could you tell if a campfire was fuelled by non-local wood? Would you have to go investigate each and every fire and argue with the people who made it? Keeping in mind that, as having to hike wood up to high elevations is somewhat strenuous, there would be an incentive to "live off the land" and cheat ...


3

(Sharing this because I felt pretty stupid at the time and hope people learn from my stupidity.) I almost started a fire by mistake in BC 3 yrs ago, in a very remote area. I thought moss did not burn well - it does. Luckily I saw it within 30 seconds and I was 20m away from the shoreline - dumped my drinking water to start with, doused with repeat hauls of ...


6

It's the sparks/small expelled burning bits I'd worry about, they can go a long way in the wind (far more than your 10ft, and a grate doesn't keep them in), although there's not a huge amount you can do if they start a fire up in a tree. In drought conditions, even if fires are permitted by law and conditions, I'd keep them to a minimum in size and time - a ...


4

Do not bring in firewood. From the Nason Creek Campground page: Don't Move Firewood: Please protect Pacific Northwest forests by preventing the spread of invasive species. Firewood can carry insects and diseases that can threaten the health of our western forests. You can make a difference by obtaining and burning your firewood near your camping destination....


19

The short answer is No, never leave a fire unattended. The reasons are some of the ones you listed above, but you understated the major risk: Unattended fires can easily spread - a log rolls out or cinders/sparks escape and set the forest on fire. Fires can be seemingly out, but retain enough heat to re-start themselves easily. 10 feet (~3 m) is not a large ...


2

With a little time on my hands I tried an experiment. It was just about successful. I used the windshield/pot stand from my alcohol stove, and oak twigs, of which I have many fallen from the trees over my garden. It eventually boiled a cup of water, but having got off to a good start became really rather slow. The airflow wasn't enough in still air, not ...


Top 50 recent answers are included