23

It's possible to do it with ice that has been shaped into a convex lens. The ice needs to be clear and fairly large like 5 inches across. Obviously this won't work in the summer, and the cold temperatures won't help either, but it does look like it can be done. See, How To Start A Fire Using Magnifying Glass Made Of Ice How Do You Start a Fire With Ice? ...


20

I was once shown a great way to protect the blade on a wood axe or hatchet. I realize that ice axes are a different shape than wood axes, so this may not be a perfect solution, but maybe it will give you an inspiration for something similar. Get an old garden hose. Cut a length of the hose about as long as the axe's blade. Cut an incision down the length ...


16

I've helped a few friends make torches for medieval events they were hosting. As I was the only one who managed to burn themselves during assembly and testing, I feel somewhat informed, if a bit clumsy. Your choice of materials will depend on how long you want your torch to burn for, as well as how brightly. Specifically, your wick material and your fuel. ...


15

Stick hardwood 2 to 3ft long Wick (I guess that's suitable terminology) cotton rags Fuel lamp oil or in the context of a survival situation, animal fat.† Misc nails or fence staples Directions Soak the rags in the fuel Wrap the rags around the stick Fasten the rags to the stick with the nails, staples, or something similar. Apply fire from an open ...


11

For the spike, I usually just take a piece of corrugated cardboard, fold it to double the thickness, punch holes through it, and use some thin cord to tie it through the hole in the spike. This is low-tech and works if I lose my protector while traveling, which is what always happens. No matter where I am, it's always pretty easy to get some cardboard. For ...


11

I would try these options below in order, if you haven't already done so. Repair Contact the manufacturer or a retailer that sells that brand. There is a good chance they might fix them under warranty. I've had many good experiences with getting older equipment that you think might not be covered taken care of, but each brand varies on how far they'll go. ...


10

Contact Tent Pole Technologies. They make custom tent poles and can do so based off of the pole specs you have already listed. Many in the outdoor industry (EMS, REI, etc) use them for repairs and warranty work when they run out of the extra pole sets they have ordered for production tents.


10

Roll top dry bags are fairly common. They are usually combined with either a pack cover or a pack liner. The pack liner is commonly an over-sized roll top dry bag placed inside your backpack. A cheaper option is to use a trash compactor bag as a pack liner. They are usually cheap and easy to find in the USA. Usually, the trash bag is put inside your bag ...


10

The method by which carabiners in any color are coated (either gate or body) is anodizing, which is going to be nearly impossible to sufficiently replicate with anything practical and cost-effective at home. With anodizing, the coating essentially becomes part of the aluminum itself. So anything you put on the gate will wear off relatively quickly and ...


10

A cast is meant to promote long-term healing of a broken bone, and getting a cast typically requires a doctor in a definitive care environment. A splint is the preferred treatment for fractures and sprains in the field. The purpose of a splint is to immobilize the limb around the injury. A good splint should be well padded, comfortable for the patient, and ...


10

With just the right equipment in a laboratory setting, you can use the energy in a key fob battery to cause a spark. You can then use that to start a fire under the right conditions. However, that's not going to happen in any realistic back country conditions. The voltage and current capability of a key fob battery are just too low. The reason you can ...


10

The technical answer is simply: yes. But that answer would be deceiving, so... Can it be done? Yes. It throws out some decent sparks. The device works by scraping a tiny piece of flint over steel. In that regard, this should be no different than any other flint & steel fire lighting, with the exception of the awkward cup. See later section for the ...


9

(First of all: I'm not used to the english words here.) I think tillering trees refere to the contraptiosn you do mount on walls / something standing upright, using a string and a pulley. But you can easily do the same with just a tillering stick which is quite easy to fabricate, I think following images say more than I can say in words. All you need is a ...


9

Back when I learned to build my own bows a guy in the club I belonged to used just a ledge and a baggie of lead weights (tire balancing stuff). I suppose you could reproduce it "in the wild" hanging from a branch and a bag of stones. However that guy was an expert that forgot more than I'll ever know about bow building and didn't need to fiddle much with it ...


9

(Taking into account that we do have an "ice" answer already) The one magnifying lens that is fast and easy to get and that does have an optical quality that actually helps vision as a magnifying glass are in fact drops of water. But that's for the "home-made field microscope" application of a magnifying glass. If you consider starting fire by sunlight, ...


8

I'm a physician. High proof alcohol – be it ethanol or rubbing – causes osmotic bursting of cells – like distilled water – and hurts like Hell. It is only suitable for surfaces, or intact skin. Even peroxide is harsh, if you use over 3% strength.


8

Yes you will need a special kind of rock. The spark is a tiny bit of burning iron struck off the source of iron by a really hard rock. So if you are only using rocks then you will need 1 iron rich rock and one harder rock. Iron Pyrite (fools gold) and quartz would be one combination. Common practice is use steel as the iron source (high carbon knife or ...


8

I recommend reflective lines for at night, and standard flagging tape for during the day. Both are lightweight and the triptease line really jumps out at night when hit with a light.


8

I can think of the following two ways to cover the blade: You can use something like a Bike Handle cover, the one that has a cap on the other end. You can get it of the size that your axe-blade fits in. I assume that the main blade will be a bit hard to fit in, but then you can always give a try towards getting the handle cover which is a bit flexible(...


8

One of the most effective splinting materials is birch bark. Peel it off the tree just as you would if you were going to use it to make a canoe. It's very stiff, and it has some natural curl to it. Wrap it around the broken limb and you can use anything from triangular bandages to strips of torn clothing, duck tape, or even a sock to keep it in place. ...


8

As principle behind this think about your old light bulb. One emergency method of lighting a fire used to be to break the glass of the light bulb in your flashlight and burn the filament, no more no less than the way its done with a strand of steel wool for example. Now, when you put the filament between positive and negative there will be some resistance in ...


8

A clean sock will protect them from scratches with no need for fasteners and it takes a fair bit of pressure or impact to actually damage glasses (bending them slightly is another matter). Once wrapped they can go in the top of your pack or any pocket.


7

What came to my mind when I read WedaPashi's answer about bicycle handles was the use of old bicycle tubes to build some sheath. The rubber of the tube is flexible but it's not too easy to perforate it, therefore you can build your sheath rather close-fitting. Also you can glue it easily with bicycle patch glue.


7

I'll preface this by saying I've never tried this in a real world application myself, but I was curious and found some instructions for creating quick harnesses out of webbing from a web search. I want to add that I am in no way endorsing this for climbing or prolonged use beyond a static hang or an emergency situation. I've heard and read that rope/...


7

Windpaddle Sails is your answer. I sail the Alpacka Packrafts often and it is awesome! Check out this blog post about sailing with a bike and a packraft. Only works with a tail wind, but does not require a mast.


7

Unfortunately nail polish would probably gunk up the locking mechanism. I wouldn't put nail polish on any moving piece of a carabiner. You can use nail polish to mark your gear so you know that it's yours (and not your partner's). You may be able to find a multi-color scheme that indicates the carabiner's date, but generally that's not an issue (if it ...


7

Assuming that you are not going to use if for checking fever. There are other ways to check fever. There is no mechanism, or a piece of equipment (other than dedicated thermal transducers) I have heard of that can measure the temperature precisely. If you are just curious about how hot/cold the ambiance is, you can pull out your cellphone and get that ...


7

Yes, you can build a basic thermometer using just water, or any liquid. You first need to mostly seal it in a container (like a glass bottle) and use a straw or thin clear tube immersed in it to allow the liquid to expand up the straw. Do not let the straw touch the bottom. A 50-50 water & alcohol solution will also do the trick if you happen to have ...


7

This depends greatly on the situation at hand and there are enormous amounts of factors that will effect your decision to build in a specific location. For example, if you are in an extremely remote location and are more likely to be stranded for a long period of time, it may be more beneficial for you to seek shelter as a means of survival rather than ...


7

In the outdoors, the way to deal with cold is not to heat the environment, but to insulate yourself. You say "snow line", so it appears you aren't asking about anything particularly cold. Just get a proper sleeping bag rated for the temperature. Since you are car camping, you can bring some extra supplies like blankets. Get a sleeping bag rated for the ...


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