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7

You CAN use the fluorocarbon for tippet. In fact many high quality tippets ARE made of fluorocarbon. What you get by buying the smaller roll of tippet is portability and the ability to conveniently carry several different sizes. When fly fishing you will need to adjust your tippet according to the size/type of fly you are using and to how leader shy the ...


7

Make a surgeon's loop in the end of the leader. Use a loop-to-loop connection to join the leader to the fly line. Use a surgeon's knot to join the leader to the tippet. This isn't the strongest knot, but it is small, quick to tie and reliable. Look on the Grog's Knots website to find lots of other knots. The tippet is usually 3-4 feet, with a total ...


7

I will try to answer this, however i don't know the correct english terminology. The main reason for a tapered leader is the control you get over your fly. With a thick line, you flick (or roll, here comes the terminology issue) the tip of your rod, and you can see the "wave" travel forward through your line, until it "whips" at the end. If you try this ...


5

Riffle vs rapid: a riffle is slow moving over a generally shallow wide flat spot, but has significant turbulence (water moving in all sorts of directions) because of rocks and such. A rapid is fast moving, often deeper section of the river moving faster because it's flowing down a slope. A pool is a place where the water is deeper than the rest of the river,...


5

I use that dubbing to make flies used in tiny hook sabiki rigs. Just something that will wiggle around the hook to attract plankton feeders. I use these to catch sardines, alewives, menhaden, herrings and also sometimes perch catch well on sabiki rigs. Check your local regs, because some places don't allow sabiki rigs and or limit how many hooks you may have ...


4

Yes. You can use whatever you want for the tippet. There is no fly fishing police that enforce tippet rules. Not like the police who enforce the fishing license rules, the barb-less hooks rules, or the targeting fish out of season rules. Granted, your choices of tippet material may produce differing results but nothing works in every situation. Give it ...


4

If by braided line you mean something like spider-wire or power-pro, they wouldn't have the backbone to turn over a fly - especially something you are likely to throw for bass. Most bass plugs are fairly large and they float - so the leader/tippet doesn't really have to float. It could even be argued that you're better off with it NOT sitting on the ...


4

Yes, those do look like a soft hackle of some kind. I don't know which bird, but as long as they are soft they can be useful for a number of purposes. Globalflyfisher.com has some excellent info on specific fly tying, and their page on soft hackle includes this: Using soft hackle Soft hackle feathers are excellent for several purposes: Soft, ...


4

I assume you are considering a new reel with multiple spools. The reel's performance will not be affected except that with a lighter line you will be able to fit more backing. In a 5wt setup that usually wouldn't offer any benefit. One potential issue with using a much larger reel is the balance. You may be able to cast well with a poorly balanced setup, ...


4

I have found the side cast, and here, to be very useful in the situations you describe. I spent a number of years fishing small streams in the Blue Ridge of VA, and this type of cast gave me better reach than roll casting. I also favored a 6'6" rod in 1 or 2 wt. The short length of the rod kept me out of a lot of overhanging vegetation, but it also limited ...


4

Fishing in the rivers around here is catch and release only on barbless hooks. The trick is to not get over excited when you get a bite, let the fish take the lure, when he runs it'll set it itself, so don't tug on the rod. While he's on the hook you want to bring him in gentle, don't tug on the rod, let go and let him run with the line if he starts to fight,...


3

I have done some research since my initial post, experimented with different backing alternatives, and different brands of backing. I tried three alternatives before finding the solution to my problem. First I tried fireline. It didn't work because it is very thin and abrasive. It wouldn't be a problem, as I shouldn't have my fingers in the backing as a ...


3

To answer your question, "Which two handed fly casting style should I learn?" the answer is all of them. After you've learned every style then you'll know which one suits your needs best in any situation, but whenever you have something behind you I always recommend the roll cast, which is very effective with a double handed rod especially. As for what gear ...


3

This type of dry fly floatant powder is quite effective at drying off smaller flies. I believe it's the same silica gel that is used to keep packaged electronics dry. But I typically just press flies between folds of a cotton t-shirt briefly. This will draw most of the water out and restore "floatability" to the fly. It should also leave it dry enough to ...


3

You could use it, but it probably wouldn't be very convenient. That fluffy stuff is basically Marabou, which is one of the most popular fly tying materials, the difference between the soft hookless barbs found on your hackles, and the barbs found on semiplumes like Marabou, is the rachis, the shaft of the feather the barbs attach to. You could make use of it,...


3

I am a fly tier and I think that I can tie any fly pattern in large sizes as well as small sizes as you suggest . The only thing that you do is to keep reducing the volume of the materials used to tie the large flies as you move down to the small sizes . I hope that this helps.


3

As I'm going through a minimalist phase of fishing right now, I suggest this as a functional minimum. License; Your location determines if this is actually needed. Rod Reel; Not absolutely necessary, but it helps manage the line. Fly Line Tippet/Leader; One length of mono is what I'm using now. Flies; I'm now using only muddler minnows and a grub ...


2

I've had the most success with the 12 to 16 range. A white or gold bead head chironomid with a red/gold body is my go to for the lake trout in the Pacific Northwest. It's also picked up some smallmouth bass that get curious. Sometimes green/brown patterns work well, too. These are for imitating midge larva and pupa - the largest portion of a lake trout's ...


2

In addition to the great answer by user737012: How strong should the tippet and leader lines be? Tippet size also affects how natural your fly looks in the water. Bigger tippets are stiffer and make the movement of small flies seem unnatural. On the other hand, it is very hard to cast big flies on thin tippet because a smaller tippet will not be able to ...


2

Your rod will take longer to unload and shoot the line under these conditions, giving the line more time to fall. Since the extra line weight will cause your rod to behave as if it has a "slower action," you will need to slow down a bit and open your cast as well as cast higher on back cast. The magnitude of the effect will depend on the he rods listed ...


2

Fly lines have special coatings that help you cast and manage the line on/in the water. Under ideal conditions you would use an older line for practice on the land because repeated contact with the ground, vegetation, sticks, etc. will damage your line: Rough spots will not shoot through guides as smoothly as unblemished line. This will have a negative ...


2

The other two answers are correct. You can use plain old nylon or fluorocarbon monofilament lines and save cash (with the pitfalls mentioned by the others). Keep in mind, however, that specialised tippet brands sometimes use better materials or do fancy things to their lines like coating them with UV or abrasion resistant materials, so you may want to go ...


1

Not only is it possible, but it is a great tactic when prospecting a new stream to figure out what's working. You definitely have to modify your cast to keep the loops larger and more open, similar to the way you would with a sinking line. I find it helps to slow everything down to make this work well, for example focus on making sure your line is extended ...


1

It's actually quite simple. Tie the dry fly on the end like normal. Take the wet fly and tie it onto an appropriately sized length of tippet (between 13-24 inches) Tie the end of tippet with the dry fly to either the bend of the hook on the dry fly or to the eye of the dry fly (if you can get the line through the eye) with the same type of knot.


1

The fly patterns used in modern european nymphing are purposefully simple and effective. The philosophy behind these patterns is to suggest the shape of the insect instead of trying to perfectly match the hatch, and this makes them very versatile as well. Patterns like the tungsten torpedo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyXKOhM9wY0 Or the tungsten ...


1

The easiest fly to tie is probably an egg pattern. The fly requires a hook, high tensile thread, head glue and either a marker or a small amount of flash. This fly may take ~20 minutes the first time tied and can take <5 minutes after tying ~5 flies. It’s a great fly to begin with as you do not need to worry about a multitude of materials and managing ...


1

The easiest fly fishing technique to swing a wet fly, nymph, or streamer cast downstream. All you need to do is to cast downstream and let the current take your line until the fly sinks and comes up again due to the line tension. Eventually you will need to learn to mend to control speed and depth, but it is nothing compared to the amount of line control and ...


1

I suggest taking the target species, season and location into account as the deciding factors. I started with wet flies because I was targeting bass and panfish in a small inland lake during the summer. The lake was just a convenient place to fish and a muddler minnow was productive. If your convenient place is a nearby trout stream in the spring ...


1

For fly fishing, there are two types of flies, wet and dry. The wet flies are designed to sink and bitten by the fish underwater, while the dry lures are designed to sit on top and the fish will come up and bite them. If you are really lucky the fish will leap out of the water to do so. The short version of how they work is to you cast them out and then ...


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