60

The problem with food waste at that elevation is that there is very little soil to bury things and that decomposition happens much slower at those altitudes. Sometimes there are still marmots/pikas at that elevation who will eat left over apples and such, the problem with that is then they become dependent on humans and can even become aggressive. ...


45

If the snow was hard packed enough that a self arrest is not possible, and there are no intermediate anchors, then if one person falls, they can take the whole team down with them. If that was the case then what they should have done is to have the first person place anchors as they went up, either snow pickets or ice screws depending on the conditions. The ...


45

My viewpoint: If it is unlikely to be seen before natural processes take care of it then disposal in the wilderness isn't unreasonable. Thus, below timberline, outside Jasper National Park, walking 10 feet off the trail to bury my orange peel is reasonable. At high elevation the decomp times are large -- years. There are situations where disposal of ...


34

TLDR: Yes, it can happen at that altitude, but the odds are extremely low. Long answer High-altitude cerebral edema has happened at lower than 10,000 ft. The condition is seldom seen below 3,000 metres (9,800 ft),2 but in some rare cases it has developed as low as 2,500 metres (8,200 ft). Source To give an idea of how rare those rare cases are, ...


30

Is it "severely dangerous"? Maybe Is there risk? Absolutely I'm going to say first off that you seem like you have little to no hiking/outdoor experience, and whatever answers me or other users give you here are NOT a substitute to knowing and understanding the hazards and risks yourself. Hiking is usually a pretty safe activity, but you can easily get ...


24

What mistakes did these girls make during their camping trip? I don't know that they made any glaring mistakes. The only caution I would note (and you'll see that it's of limited value in this particular case) is that they were two women camping alone in a very remote area of North Africa (although Morocco was not considered a threat to tourists at the time)...


23

Both words refer to the same topography, which is a saddle point. The land goes up in two opposite directions, and down in the two other opposite directions. To me at least, a col is just this basic topography. However, a pass implies the saddle point is a reasonable travel connection between the two downhill directions. Since the two uphill directions ...


23

The most common options coming to my mind are: Securing from anchors and building e.g. one rope-party with 2 and one with 3 members This is slow but very safe. You do it in steep and/or difficult terrain. Moving continuously being roped together while the first uses gear Using e.g. a tibloc or you can use rocks to let the rope move behind them (with ...


19

The way to protect yourself against attacks like this is to greatly reduce the probability of being attacked. Granted, you can be attacked anywhere (Yosemite, the Appalachian Trail) for any reason or for seemingly no reason -- but choose a place for vacation where such attacks are very low probability -- Yosemite and the Appalachian Trail, despite one case ...


18

Pass and col are synonymous. Col is French whereas the word pass has entered the Germanic languages (German word is Pass). The word col entered English usage because of anglophone mountaineers in the French Alps.


18

A few random tips from many years of mountain running: There is no shame in walking part or all the way up a long hill. The best runners in the world do it. Pick destinations that excite you, even if they're a little harder to get to or feel slightly outside of your comfort zone. Always bring a headlamp. Always bring a lightweight windbreaker. The first ...


16

Sound reflected by concave surfaces will concentrate in a narrow area rather like light passing through a convex lens. You were probably at one of the focal points for the sound being reflected in the cwm behind the person you could hear.


15

I have come-up with a hand-run sketch, may or may not be accurate. But I have tried to translate the local terms we use, and I have pick-up the terms in English that came closest in terms of meaning. EDIT: See updated images. In second image, top left corner, I have tried to come-up with something which can explain Face and Cliff. From point A, one would ...


14

While heights do change slowly by natural processes such changes are likely to be on the order of centimeters barring any extreme events. Most changes in published heights of hills since people started measuring these things accurately (only the last couple of hundred years) are due to improvements/investments in technology. Measuring the height of a hill ...


14

Well, I'll share a list of peaks that are open and people do in India. Uttarakhand state: Panvali Dwaar (6663 m) - Song(RH) - Khati - Dwalio - Phukia - Base Camp - C - I,C - II and summit (Long: 79o57', Lat: 30o17') Nanda Khat (6545m) - Bharari(RH) - Loharkhet - Khati - Dwali(Vill) - Base Camp,C - I,C - II,C - III summit attempt (Long: 79o58', Lat: 30o18') ...


14

About the only real danger of the ones you mentioned is a scorpion under a rock you just picked up. They do hide in crevasses under rocks during the day. Just be aware that there might be a scorpion under any rock, and pick it up accordingly. For example, if it's a fist-sized rock, don't pick it up by wrapping your hand around it. If in doubt, kick the ...


13

It look like they are "moving together". Very common in alpine ascents when moving over easier ground where it would take too long to pitch the climb (fixed belay). The leader would run out around 10-20 meters to the second and would look for rock features or quick placements to get some protection in. Notice the rock features on the ascent, I'm guessing ...


12

A list of changes to the Munro list and database of Munros and tops can be found at The Database of British and Irish hills. The list is maintained by the Scottish Mountaineering club (SMC) and is published in the SMC Journal. As far as I am aware, an update is only published when there is a change to the list. This is normally because of new survey data ...


12

Climbing scree is a skill all on it's own. The trick is to have good balance and have a good feel for the ground, and gradually transfer your weight from one foot to the other, almost like walking on thin ice, you don't want the scree to "break". If you can plant your foot just right, and ease your weight on to it, then you can often manage to progress ...


11

Layering and wicking. Back to layering and wicking in a minute, but first note that 3,000 meters (9,842 feet) isn't really all that high compared to what you are aiming for, which is above 5,500 meters (18,045 feet). That extra 8,000 plus feet means a temperature drop of 16 degrees F (9 degrees C) to 24 degrees F (13 degrees C), more if you go higher. ...


11

I'd like to first say that I'm not sure that these suggestions would have helped the hikers described in the post. Here are some suggestions which may help to avoid human threats. Camp relatively near many other groups of campers or, preferably, near authorities, such as near a park ranger station As #1 isn't always possible, it can be possible to camp in a ...


10

I wouldn't recommend gaining 3700+ meters in 2 days. It's not about fitness. It's just about how well your body adapts to altitude. I agree that 3700 meters is not too high to get severely sick due to AMS, but then, it's not recommended to gain more than 1000 meters of vertical distance per day. Also, I know friends who have suffered from altitude sickness ...


10

Mountains change height on geologic time scales. If a list of mountains above a certain height changes in one or two human lifetimes, then very likely this is due to measurement errors or refinements. I remember a decade or two ago when GPS first became widely available that someone made a big deal of claiming K2 was higher than Everest. That turned out ...


9

Most importantly: be prepared. Always bring sufficient warm and waterproof clothing to make the worst possible weather for the area and time of year survivable. An emergency bivouac sack, a warm hat and gloves weigh very little, and can save your life. Also, something to start a fire (a lighter is not ideal as it could fail in very cold conditions), which ...


9

Lenin Peak is another likely candidate. Just quoting from the wiki page (that looks heavily copied from summitpost). It is considered one of the easiest 7,000 m peaks in the world to climb and it has by far the most ascents of any 7,000 m or higher peak on Earth, with every year seeing hundreds of climbers make their way to the summit. and The ...


9

It's impossible to say from a photograph whether something is "safe" or not. Many factors come into play, including the experience level of the climbers concerned. For all we know, they may have been roped together for a glacier traverse, and chosen to stay roped up for a short section well within their capabilities, knowing they will need to be protected ...


9

As mentioned by others: It is impossible to definitely judge the situation from just the photo, and that's all we have. As far as I see, there is no protection between the roped climbers here. So my answer is under the following assumption: The party is roped up with lots of rope between climbers without any protection in a steep slope of mixed snow and ...


9

In general there is nothing better than what you said: Go select a hill and start running. If you have (possibly experienced) company all the better. There is one point that you should keep in mind though: Running technique. On flat ground technique is already important for efficiency and to go easy on the joints. This is even more important when running ...


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