24

As per Aravona's comment, this is a firebug (Pyrrhocoris apterus). According to Wikipedia, they are not dangerous and nothing to worry about. German version has way more info about this than the English one. Also, they seem to be very common in Europe and parts of Africa and Asia.


17

Probably a woodlouse which is a type of crustacean in the suborder Oniscidea. Source: a-z animals They are globally distributed, except in polar regions and arid deserts, and are also known by the following names: "armadillo bug" "boat-builder" (Newfoundland, Canada) "butcher boy" or "butchy boy" (Australia,mostly around Melbourne) "carpenter" ...


13

It's the Great Peacock Moth Caterpillar. See Wikipedia for other images, including a painting of the moth by Van Gogh. Saturnia pyri, the giant peacock moth, also called the great peacock moth, giant emperor moth, or Viennese emperor, is a Saturniid moth which is native to Europe. It is the largest European moth, with a wingspan reaching 15-20 cm. ...


12

This is definitely a tick. If it were a spider it would appear that the legs all come from a central point, as spider bodies are separated into segments, whereas tick bodies are not. There are two main types of ticks - hard ticks and soft ticks. They look quite different. Hard ticks have what's known as a scutum (translates to shield) that covers the front ...


11

Its very hard to distinguish from that sound clip but my guess as to what you are hearing is probably cicadas depending on your location. They can sound like a buzzing or hissing noise and generally are most active during the peak of summer. If you look you will probably find their shells they have left behind after crawling out of the ground to start their ...


11

Most likely a Caddisfly. They make homes of twigs and stones. CADDISFLY: The caddisfly lives only a short time as an adult but may spend several years as a larva. Many larvae can do something few aquatic insects can – they build their own shelter. Different kinds of caddisflies build different types of homes. Some species build homes of leaves ...


10

Your bite/sting mark is missing something very essential in order to qualify it as a bite or sting mark, and that is: a mark from a bite or a sting. Had something bit you or stung you, then you would be able to see a little hole or pincer mark in the middle of that very colourful bruise you have. Coincidence of all coincidences, I lived in Miamisburg for a ...


9

That is a White Marked Tussock Moth. The long, spiky tufts of hairs give fair warning to anyone or anything that tries to touch this species' larva. The caterpillar is covered with them and the chemicals that are transferred onto skin when touched can cause an allergic reaction in humans resulting in redness, irritation and welts. ... It also has ...


9

That actually looks to be a Woodlouse Hunter (Dysdera crocata). They prey exclusively on woodlice. They also go by a few other names such as: woodlouse spider, sowbug hunter, sowbug killer, pillbug hunter, and slater spider. Image source: http://www.whatsthatbug.com/category/spiders/sow-bug-killers/ From the Pennsylvania State Entomology Department site: ...


9

I would vote for the Potter wasp. The nests of it look like a jug made out of mud. The potter wasps have at least two generations each season. That might explain why you've had this nest twice. Of course I can't say that for certain. But what really brought me to conclusion was your "some sort of larvae inside". The female potter wasp lays one egg in the ...


8

This is a dragonfly. Damselflies place their wings alongside their body when resting. Dragonflies can not do this, once they had their first flight after hatching. So when you see their wings pointing to their back, it's a damselfly or maybe a freshly hatched dragonfly (in these cases you can tell the difference by the cocoon, or just wait to see the wing ...


7

I see these everywhere where I live (Central Texas). We usually call them "pill bugs" or "rollie-polies" (usu. young children). It shouldn't do you or anything you own any harm; they mostly just crawl around on things and roll up into a ball when you touch them. Kids would always run around collecting them when I was in school.


7

Based on the poor-quality of the photos (and my limited knowledge of Singapore insects) it would be very difficult to definitively ID this to species. However, based on the shape and size, you're very likely looking at a species of ladybird beetle (aka ladybug; family Coccinellidae). Specifically, I think this is a member of the subfamily Chilocorinae. ...


6

This looks like a Pedostrangalia revestita (i totally ripped this from the site below. I have no idea if this is correct, I am still looking for the English and German terms (in German it is a kind of Bockkäfer)) http://cerambyx.uochb.cz/pedostrangalia_revestita.php I am by no means an expert, but those look alike. The wing-covers have similar shapes, red ...


6

The first one could be a German cockroach (Blattella germanica). The seconds one though… not sure if it is a cockroach? Perhaps you could catch sharper photos with a bit more lighting?


6

That is a camel spider, they became famous on social media when the US invaded Iraq in the middle east where they are more common, and the troops started taking pictures and sending them home. Apparently they are also found in the SW USA, which I didn't know. Good news is they aren't venomous, they just have really nasty jaws that can rip and shred flesh. ...


6

That is a species of longhorn beetle called Aristobia approximator. There are two or three different species that live in my region but I wasn't familiar with this particular one which is quite impressive looking. Since it seems to feed on teak, this has to be an Asian species.


6

From what i can tell, and the little bit of research i did it appears to be a "Flat backed millipede" or part of the Polydesmida family, of which there are a huge variety and many are hard to tell apart. Polydesmida (from the Greek poly "many" and desmos "bond") is the largest order of millipedes, containing approximately 3,500 species,1 including all the ...


5

It is a species of scarab beetle. It looks very much like "Tropinota hirta" (hirta means hairy) which is quite common in the Mediterranean region, but might also be Tropinota squalida. They are fruit crop pests and, as a general group, are also known as "chafers". Another common name for this pest is "apple blossom beetle". They are probably most attracted ...


5

Definitely a wolf spider (i.e., family Lycosidae). Possibly Hogna frondicola or some closely related species. Source: Spiderid.com The white ball is an egg sac. From Wikipedia: wolf spiders carry their egg sacs by attaching them to their spinnerets. You can see similar pictures to your of wolf spiders carrying egg sacs here and here. Source: ...


5

Those are Cicadas, they live in the ground for years and crawl out only to moult their skins as adults and mate. They have an obnoxiously loud mating call, I'm sure you've heard it, they'll often emerge from the ground all at once, there are some places where they come out like clockwork every five years, thousands of them all in the same night, those ...


5

From your pictures, those look like discarded cicada husks. They're not "alive". You can just knock them off with whatever tool you prefer for such things (broom, paint scraper, etc.) There is no real need to prevent them. The cicadas molt and move on, leaving the husks.


5

We went back today and spoke with the naturalist, Cindy, who's part of a team that cares for that property which includes hundreds of acres. These are webbed nests filled with hundreds of caterpillars of the fall webworm moth, (Hyphantria cunea). The caterpillars are tiny and hairy, and at the early stage can be any dark color. There's an outer fur that ...


5

As far as I can see, only your original picture from 2016 shows sign of woolly adelgid. The tree is not in focus since the point of the picture was the doves, but here are some clues: The white dots look characteristic of a woolly adelgid infestation, and a rather severe one if the dots can be seen from the top of the branches. Another clue is the ...


4

Looks like a fully engorged deer (black-legged) tick. Can't tell from your picture whether it's larva or nymph. Here's a size comparison photo: https://news.psu.edu/sites/default/files/styles/threshold-768/public/CM%20ADD-TICKS221.jpg?itok=Z2ArX1YF Top left is larva with nymph at its right. Call your doctor about possible exposure to Lyme or other tick-...


3

I'm not 100%, but I am going to call that a yellow striped armyworm, Spodoptera ornithogalli. These things seem to be widely distributed and very common; I've seen them frequently in my travels but never bothered to look it up until today. Here's some additional, more close-up images for comparison: Here's what it becomes as an adult:


3

So I also posted this question on reddit, and got back a response, which seems correct, so I figured I'd go ahead and post an answer (although my stepdad gets credit for guessing correctly before reddit). This spider is most likely a Nephila clavipes (colloquially known as a banana spider): Per bugguide.net, females can grow up to 50 mm; males can grow up ...


2

This is a terrestrial isopod crustacean called a woodlouse (colloquially referred to as pill bugs, potato bugs, roly-pollies, sow bugs, etc.). There are over 5000 species in the world with at least 64 in Russia (see Kuznetsova & Gongalsky 2012). Habitat: Woodlice are typically found in damp, dark places -- in the soil, under rocks/logs/debris, etc. ...


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