Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Both sport climbing and trad climbing are a form of lead climbing, which means the first climber to go up is not protected by a rope from above. A sport climber uses quickdraws which, as you mentioned, get clipped to bolts that have been placed in 10 to 15 foot intervals. At the end of the climb a sport climber can expect to find a belay anchor consisting of ...


16

Whether you run out of rope or just can't complete the route, you have to bail as safely as possible. As soon as your belayer reaches the rope's middle mark, he should double check that there's a stopper knot at the end. Then, you would down climb to the nearest bolt and then proceed to bail on the route using a prusik backup, as described by this old Petzl ...


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I am not a very good climber as such, and I am 5'7" only. I think I am dwarf enough to put in my experiences here: As you rightly said, being short can be very frustrating when you don't get to access a specific hold. There are a few techniques that might help a short climber do amazingly well. Realize that you may not be able to do exactly the same ...


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You (arguably) are right. I would even approach it the other way around: Should there be another description for outdoor lead climbing on bolted routes. "Proof": Climbing on artificial holds has become a pretty huge competitive sport. The main international association for this sport is called IFSC: "International Federation of Sport Climbing". As it's ...


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The simplest and most straightforward solution would be to connect yourself to a ground anchor. If you decide to do this while belaying a lead climber, you might want to let the rope slide a little when they fall, because you will lose the ability to provide a soft-catch by offsetting your body-weight.


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Every time a climber finds a way to place more fingers on a hold, he/she will. If he/she is not using all fingers, it's because: They're training their fingers to get stronger, It's impossible to place more fingers on the hold, They have injured fingers they do not want to use and worsen, They're careless because the route is too easy for them.


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The best single tip I got when I started bouldering (especially overhangs) is If you are reaching for the next hold with your right hand, keep most of the weight on your right foot. If you are reaching with your left hand, keep most of the weight on your left foot. This is to prevent barn-dooring. In fact, taking the other foot off a hold will often counter-...


12

As a girl 167cm tall (5'7") I'm on a shorter side of climbers spectra. I believe that while sometimes not being able to reach a hold can mean a no-go on a route, there is plenty of situations where being short gives you the edge: Shorter body means shorter levers. This comes handy in steep overhangs and in any other situation that requires a lot of body ...


11

Here are some features to keep in mind when buying climbing shoes once you're past the beginner phase: Downturned: Most beginner shoes are pretty flat, which are fine for mainly vertical walls. However, as you climb harder stuff on overhanging walls, it's helpful to have downturned shoes for maintaining a hook-like foot shape. This allows you to hook your ...


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Fall More. If you're not falling a lot, then you're not pushing yourself enough, ergo you won't see much improvement. Grasping a basic understanding of proper climbing technique is what enables most new climbers to quickly advance in their climbing abilities, but once you have that understanding of climbing principles, then your limitations are mostly ...


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When it's beyond the lifetime recommended by the manufacturer. When you see abrasion or damage that is more than superficial on any of the load-bearing components. This means you have to inspect your harness regularly. When it has been in contact with a number of strongly corrosive substances. When there is discoloration (indicates excessive exposure to ...


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I don't know what makes you think climbing ropes are limited at 80m. They are produced in one very long strand and then cut to the sizes you find in the store. I agree 80m is the max for what is usually found in stores, but you can get 200m ropes or climbing rope by the meter. A random google hit (no affiliation): http://www.climbinganchors.com.au/climbing-...


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If you start a route, fall, lower down a bit, and then climb to the top, most people would not say that you have sent the route. See What is the term for completing a climbing route uncleanly?. Most people think of sending a route as climbing it cleanly. If you start a route, fall, lower to the ground, and then climb the route cleanly, that is clearly 2 ...


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Not much advantage being a short climber to be honest.I'm probably the shortest around, I'm 5'1" male @ 120lbs and getting stronger in my mid 30's. I can solve most problems, but not all reachy problems with no intermediates. Be creative all the most, no different than your daily life. Its what life has brought to me is to think outside the box. Sometimes ...


9

Regarding Grading That's a very common question for people new to competition climbing. Route setting for competition is in general quite different than for "regular" gym routes. Route setters at comps have several, sometimes conflicting requirements, which also vary depending on the round (quali, semi, finals): Create spread Nothing more unnerving than ...


9

Retire that sling. Use it for some handicraft work at home or similar. Firstly: If in doubt about a piece of gear, don't entrust your live to it. Doing a more detailed analysis without seeing it in real live is hard, but here are two arguments apart from the doubt one (which is enough) that come to mind: It looks like there is a discoloration right on ...


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I think it is easiest to understand if you think about a small pocket where you can fit a single finger in deeply and securely or jam two fingers in poorly. While it is always nice to distribute the weight between two fingers instead of one finger, sometimes the grip you get on a hold is much better with one finger than with two fingers. For the hold shown ...


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Most likely this is not a problem of physical power or endurance. A moderately active person should have sufficiently trained legs for climbing. This is especially true for the beginner end of the difficulty range where footholds can be stood on passively (as opposed to actively pulling oneself towards the wall with the feet). Disco legs are typically a ...


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As other people already have mentioned here. In general, it is a disadvantage to be tall. If you look at height-performance profiles in rock climbing, they are generally downward-sloping (meaning the taller you are, the lower you performance on average). See the following graph I created (the first graph look at male climbers while the second considers ...


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Okay, I'm 5'4" and female. I have small hands and feet, and am very flexible. For my fellow short people, the best advice I got is from this very helpful website from Tiffany: Tiffany's Climbing Tips for Short People. And, cross train with yoga. Tall people have a harder time touching your toes. But if you can touch your toes, you can turn a hand hold into ...


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Firstly, warm up neatly, and Try to move through the overhang. Visualize the moves and flow through them. If you stop it's hard to get moving again. Use your whole body. It's easy to get good hands and try and pull yourself up. If you observe good climbers on overhanging problems or routes you will likely notice that they continually twist and turn, keeping ...


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I'm guessing from how you phrased your question that you are really interested in how rebolting, specifically bolt removal, is performed. I have never rebolted anything, but the ASCA (American Safe Climbing Association) has pretty thorough articles for people interested in learning how to rebolt climbs here. It goes over the following topics in very good ...


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A 2/3 weight ratio is definitely at the absolut top of what is routinely manageable for lead climbing, and I would not recommend that for novices. Additional weights are an option, but 10 pounds will probably not be enough. The center of gravity for the belayer is not really an issue, but a lot of weight in a vest is going to be uncomfortable for them. A ...


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Regarding your own safety: Attachment: Do actually use and clip into the auto-belay system. It sounds ridiculous, but according to @Guran did happen, and it's not that hard to imagine. In many gyms the auto-belay is clipped to some kind of fabric attached to the wall, that will cover a section of the climb. Thus it's almost impossible to start climbing ...


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The first thing I would do is yell down to my belayer to put a knot in the end of the rope. You could also try to evaluate the situation and try to figure out what happened. Is it a route that requires a 70 meter rope, and you just didn't realize that? Is it possible that you passed by a belay and didn't see it? Next you could look around for options, such ...


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As the comments have mentioned, grades vary somewhat between gyms, but I think you can still provide some rough guidelines. Peg boards can probably be done by anyone at any climbing level. You're not stressing your fingers really, so there's little chance of injury. It's essentially like practicing pull-ups. It probably won't help your climbing too much (...


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