Hot answers tagged

29

No, it is not safe to use denatured alcohol for two good reasons: Denatured alcohol refers to a class of ethanol produced for industrial uses that has been "denatured," which essentially means "made undrinkable" by mixing other compounds that are toxic or unpleasant to humans. The thing is, you, as the consumer, have no idea what exactly was mixed in. ...


23

I'm going with "it's too dangerous, so don't do it". I have two manufactured alcohol stoves, and both contain warnings against refill while hot. That being said, my answer is "You don't". Pictured (I can't see the video) suggests a squeeze bottle with a plastic tube running into a reservoir where the alcohol is supposed to be while flames are clearly ...


18

This was done on the American Frontier, and during the American Civil War. According to this journal from the American Medical Association printed in 1893, it is a good antiseptic. Apparently, alcohol works by breaking down the protein bonds. It looks like this question has been asked by many other people, and other than historical sources, there doesn't ...


17

You don't, adding liquid fuel to stove with a live flame is never recommended. Related meta post Do we want a post notice for questions where people are using equipment in ways that are clearly incorrect or dangerous? Believing the stove to be out of fuel, she tried to pour more denatured alcohol into it from a large container that exploded, shooting ...


16

Is whiskey a good disinfectant in an emergency situation while in the outdoors? Ideally any strong alcohol, whether whiskey, vodka, tequila or some other strong liquor should not be used to clean wounds. But in an a survival situation, I would not hesitate to use whiskey or some other strong liquor such as vodka on a wound while in the great outdoors. ...


9

There are four common types of stove alcohol: methanol, ethanol, denatured alcohol, and isopropanol. You can usually find them in hardware stores and (but not always) in camping stores. You can also get it as gas line antifreeze in automotive stores but be careful to read the label because antifreeze also comes in several other forms. Methanol Methanol is ...


8

I'm a physician. High proof alcohol – be it ethanol or rubbing – causes osmotic bursting of cells – like distilled water – and hurts like Hell. It is only suitable for surfaces, or intact skin. Even peroxide is harsh, if you use over 3% strength.


7

The answer is to not use a repurposed water bottle. Further, use completely different types of containers for fuel and water so you can't mix them up. Back in the day (the 1970's) when white gas stoves were popular (yes, the still are - I have one and it works great), there were aluminum fuel bottles. And, people generally used Nalgene bottles (or big metal ...


7

The effects of alcohol are exacerbated at altitude, each ounce of alcoholic beverage will have a greater perceived effect on the consumer. This is in part due to the lower oxygen level in the blood of anyone at altitude, usually this is most notable at or above 8,000ft. There are some ways to mitigate the effects of alcohol, and speed recovery. Drink ...


7

From http://www.instructables.com/id/Alcohol-Can-penny-stove/ We now need to crimp the edge of the base can so it fits inside the top can, with your pliers go around the edge of the can, grip about 5mm of the can in the pliers and twist to pull the edge in, complete this every 5mm or so all the way round. I tried something like this years ago. I ...


7

This is dangerous And the most dangerous thing about it - is that it gives the appearance of not being dangerous. Don't refill a lit alcohol stove without being aware that it could become a fireball that will consume your facial hair, your tent, your skin, your travel mates and/or your/their visual acuity for perhaps life. Sure. It might work once. Or ...


6

As many other posters pointed out, drinking alcohol to prevent dehydration is counter-productive. However, there are other uses for a bottle of high-proof booze in a survival situation. When its proof is high enough to be flammable, it can be used as a fire accelerant or even as fuel for cooking It can be used to disinfect open wounds to avoid a nasty ...


6

The "Standard" would be to only use containers specifically designed and marked for the type of fuel it is holding. There are a number of reasons; safety, legal and physical to not repurpose used containers to hold fuel. I won't go through them, as you are not asking about the implications of this, you are asking for the standard. The standard is to ...


4

There are several methods, one is adding water. The thinking is this: the alcohol should be at about 75% alcohol, and denatured alcohol sold in the US already has some water in it, or other compounds depending on its intended use (or of the means by which it is denatured). So, if you're not good at math, add H₂O and experiment. Otherwise, use the actual ...


4

Martin's answer is good. Adding a few tidbits: Most alcohol stoves will burn other alcohols. Denatured alcohol usually refers to ethanol with an agent added that makes it undrinkable. The 3 carbon alcohols (propanols) also burn well. Iso-propanol is often marketed as rubbing alcohol. Read the label: Often comes as 70%, 90% and 99% alcohol. Higher ...


4

Alcohol is poisonous, it saturates your blood with sugars and will dehydrate you faster as your body sucks your own cells dry in need of water to dilute those sugars. If you're in a survival situation, and all that you have left is the heavy bottle of alcohol that you somehow forgot about and didn't notice weighing down your bag, the best thing to do with it ...


4

If all I had was some liquor, I would not be drinking that. Drinking alcohol causes dehydration, so while you might feel some very very temporary relief from having liquid in your throat, it's going to hurt you in terms of dehydration overall. Additionally, as you said, alcohol leads to poor judgement and reduced decision making skills. That's only going to ...


4

One expensive component is the cooking pot; depending on if you already have one, you might want to find a stove that is compatible with your existing pot. Trail Designs have several models that can burn both alcohol and wood. You can order their stoves for specific pot sizes. I have experience with their Sidewinder Ti-Tri which can also burn esbit. I would ...


3

A solution that meets all of your criteria (with the possible exception of being robust) is a DIY cat food alcohol stove used with a DIY Bushbuddy-style gasifier stove. Both are easily and cheaply made, and very lightweight. Hundreds of people use one or the other, or both, in all seasons. When in alcohol mode, put the stove inside the bushbuddy; the ...


3

I would use a red, yellow, or green bottle - and never a blue, white, or clear bottle, no matter how you labelled it. Red is typically used for gasoline. Kerosene is stored in blue. Diesel is stored in yellow. And combustable oil is stored in green containers. I know, blue containers is also used to store potable water, so I would avoid blue. In the ...


3

While not a traditional penny stove, I built Tetkoba's Capillary Hoop Stove out of 3 cans of Red Bull like he did. It took a lot of force to push the hoop inside the main body, but it never split. It's quite sturdy fully assembled, so the Red Bull cans get my approval.


3

The all time best for my money has been the 12oz Heineken Keg Can. If cut correctly, the parts are much easier to slide together securely. Unfortunately, these cans can be pretty difficult to get a hold of these days, as mostly regular straight sided cans are distributed now. If you can get them, instructions here. The second best I've experienced, while ...


2

Always use a fuel container. They are marked and designed for fuel. Never use improvised water containers for fuel. There are various sizes available in retail shops and online.


2

You can try a non chemical way to add visibility to an almost invisible flame: a small metal net layer on top of the flame that the flame will go through and after just a few seconds will be incandescent and glow red / orange there are already made devices, I cant find a proper translation, in Italian they are called “retina rompifiamma” or “spargi fiamma” ...


2

See "How to Make Colored Fire (Ask an Expert)", while the article is intended for fireplaces and not cooking amongst the recommendations is borax which is not very poisonous (in some countries it is used in food, while in others it is banned - so don't drink it or spill it on your food). This will produce a yellowish green flame. If edibility is extremely ...


2

Might I suggest "Trangia" stoves? I've had mine for 21 years. Alright, it looks knackered, but it has never let me down, never. This is the old style Trangia, with a liquid fuel burner, not the type where you can adapt it to take gas. If you choose not to use liquid fuel, the base of the stove can be used to burn anything you desire, as long as it doesn't ...


2

Your travel to Scotland has probably passed, hope you had a good time. You are in the land of my favorite single malts: glendronach, oban, and glenmorangie - and therein lies my answer: Use ethyl alcohol in a pinch. That is, any high-proof potable spirit, generally anything 75% or more alcohol. Rum, for example, is often used for flambé, and any 151 ...


1

Alcohol is a high flammable liquid so better answer is to spread it all over the woods (if there's any) and make a spark, the help will reach you faster than you thought. ;)


1

I make little roll-up titanium stoves myself, you could try if these DIY designs meet your needs. They burn long sticks so that there is no need to break up small fuel sticks. The power of the stove comes from a removable USB fire blower that let you burn wet wood. Using the blower alone I can run a two pot stove without using a formal stove body. Lastly, ...


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